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Corporations Bureau moves to secretary of state’s jurisdiction

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The state Corporations Bureau will be transferred to the Business Services Division of the Office of the New Mexico Secretary of State in Santa Fe effective July 1.

The move is a result of a constitutional amendment that was passed by the electorate in the November 2012 general election which removed the constitutional authority to charter and regulate corporations from the Public Regulation Commission.

During the 2013 legislative session the Legislature passed enabling legislation that now provides the secretary of state statutory authority to charter corporations, the secretary of state’s office said in a news release.

The current secretary of state website at www.sos.state.nm.us will have its own corporations webpage. It will provide information including all applications for incorporation of domestic and foreign corporations, limited liability companies, foreign business trusts and other miscellaneous business entities.

The public will continue to have the ability to conduct research on existing corporation information. Registered corporations will have access to online filing of their corporate reports.

The new address for mailing any corporate filings or correspondence will change to Office of the New Mexico Secretary of State, Attn: Corporations Bureau, 325 Don Gaspar — Suite 300, Santa Fe, NM 87501.

Fore more corporate information or corporate forms visit www.sos.state.nm.us or contact the Corporations Bureau at 800-477-3632 or 505-827-4508.

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