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How your congressional delegates voted

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Contact your legislators at the U.S. Capitol
Zip codes: House 20515, Senate 20510
Capitol operator: (202) 224-3121

NATIONAL PARKS, MUSEUMS: Voting 252 for and 173 against, the House on Oct. 2 passed a GOP measure (HJ Res 70) to reopen the National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution, National Gallery of Art and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum during the ongoing, partial government shutdown. The Senate then tabled (killed) this measure while also turning back separate attempts by House Republicans to restore funding for the District of Columbia budget and veterans’ education, employment and disability programs.

A yes vote was to reopen federal parks, memorials and museums.

YES: PEARCE NO: LUJAN GRISHAM, LUJÁN

‘CLEAN’ BUDGET VOTE: On a party-line vote of 230 for and 194 against, House Republicans on Oct. 2 turned back a Democratic bid for an up-or-down vote on a continuing resolution to immediately fund the entire government without GOP contingencies such as curbs on the Affordable Care Act. This is called a “clean CR” in congressional parlance. On this vote, the House upheld a parliamentary ruling that the Democratic motion was not germane to an underlying GOP measure.

A yes vote was to block consideration of a “clean” funding bill.

YES: PEARCE NO: LUJAN GRISHAM, LUJÁN

INDIVIDUAL MANDATE, EMPLOYER CONTRIBUTIONS: Voting 228 for and 201 against, the House on Sept. 30 amended HJ Res 59 to delay for one year the individual mandate at the heart of the Affordable Care Act. This measure also sought to end employer subsidies of the health-insurance premiums paid by members of Congress, congressional staff members and many who work in the White House. These individuals now participate in the government-wide Federal Employees Health Benefits Program (FEHBP), receiving employer (taxpayer) contributions to defray the cost of premiums. They would continue to receive these subsidies next year when they move their coverage — as they are required by law to do — from the federal plan to a private plan of their choice in the Affordable Care Act exchanges.

A yes vote was to delay the health law’s employer mandate and end premium subsidies for congressional health insurance.

YES: PEARCE NO: LUJAN GRISHAM, LUJÁN

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH: Voting 254 for and 171 against, the House on Oct. 2 passed a measure (HJ Res 73) to exempt the National Institutes of Health budget from the partial government shutdown and put the agency back on a regular budget for the fiscal year that began Oct. 1.

A yes vote was to reopen the NIH.

YES: PEARCE NO: LUJAN GRISHAM, LUJÁN

VETERANS’ BENEFITS FUNDING: Voting 259 for and 157 against, the House on Oct. 3 sent the Senate a measure (HJ Res 72) to restore funding of veterans’ education, employment and disability programs to levels in place before the ongoing, partial government shutdown. Sponsors said the bill would fund essential services for 30 days, while critics said it neglected other important programs for veterans.

A yes vote was to restore funding for some veterans’ programs.

YES: PEARCE NO: LUJAN GRISHAM, LUJÁN

REPEAL OF MEDICAL-DEVICES TAX: The House on Sept. 29 voted, 248 for and 174 against, to repeal a 2.3 percent excise tax on medical devices that is projected to generate $3 billion annually in funding for the 2010 health law known officially as the Affordable Care Act and informally as Obamacare. The repeal was added to a continuing resolution (HJ Res 59), later sent to the Senate, that would fund the government at an annual rate of $986 billion between Oct.1- Dec. 15. The resolution also would delay for one year parts of Obamacare such as the individual mandate that have not already taken hold.

A yes vote was to repeal the medical-devices tax.

YES: PEARCE NO: LUJAN GRISHAM, LUJÁN

DELAY OF HEALTH LAW: The House on Sept. 29 voted, 231 for and 192 against, to delay for one year, until 2015, provisions of the Affordable Care Act such as the individual mandate that have not already taken hold. This amendment to HJ Res 59 (above) also allows employers and insurance firms participating in the health law to refuse to insure any medical procedure or item that conflicts with their religious beliefs or moral convictions. And it set Dec. 15 as the expiration date for the continuing resolution in place of the Senate-passed date of Nov. 15.

A yes vote was to delay the health law for one year.

YES: PEARCE NO: LUJAN GRISHAM, LUJÁN

UNBROKEN MILITARY FUNDING: Voting 423 for and none against, the House on Sept. 29 sent the Senate a bill (HR 3210) stipulating that funding for the salaries of uniformed and civilian military personnel and payments to military contractors would continue without interruption in the event of a government shutdown this fall.

A yes vote was to pass the bill.

YES: LUJAN GRISHAM, PEARCE, LUJÁN

‘CLEAN’ BUDGET, INDIVIDUAL MANDATE: Voting 54 for and 46 against, the Senate on Sept. 30 approved yet another version of a continuing resolution (HJ Res 59) to fund the government from Oct. 1-Nov. 15. With this vote, the Senate also tabled (killed) House-passed amendments to delay the health law’s individual mandate and bar employer subsidies of health-insurance premiums for members of Congress, congressional staff members and many on the White House staff. There was no floor debate preceding this party-line vote.

A yes vote was to approve a clean stopgap budget and uphold employer subsidies of congressional health insurance.

YES: UDALL, HEINRICH

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