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France, Germany to demand limits on U.S. spying

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BRUSSELS – Indignant at reports of U.S. electronic espionage overseas, the leaders of Germany and France said Friday that they will insist the Obama administration agree by the end of the year to limits that could put an end to alleged American eavesdropping on foreign leaders, businesses and innocent citizens.

Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy delivers his speech during the opening ceremony of the XXIII Iberoamerican Summit in Panama City, Friday, Oct. 18, 2013. Several regional issues may emerge during the sessions, including the ongoing dispute among Costa Rica, Nicaragua and Colombia over maritime limits and land-locked Bolivia's longstanding demand that Chile negotiate sovereign access to the Pacific Ocean. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)

Spain’s Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy delivers his speech during the opening ceremony of the XXIII Iberoamerican Summit in Panama City, Friday, Oct. 18, 2013. Several regional issues may emerge during the sessions, including the ongoing dispute among Costa Rica, Nicaragua and Colombia over maritime limits and land-locked Bolivia’s longstanding demand that Chile negotiate sovereign access to the Pacific Ocean. (AP Photo/Arnulfo Franco)

German spy chiefs will travel to Washington shortly to talk with U.S. officials about the spying allegations that have so angered European leaders, including whether Chancellor Angela Merkel’s own cellphone was monitored by the National Security Agency.

Merkel and French President Francois Hollande, at the final day of a European Union summit in Brussels, did not offer many specifics on what they want President Barack Obama and his intelligence chiefs to agree to.

A former French counterintelligence agent, however, told The Associated Press the European allies will likely demand the Americans sign off on a “code of good conduct” for intelligence-gathering, and could use the espionage dispute as leverage against the United States in upcoming trade talks.

“I think France and Germany would want guidelines,” said Claude Moniquet, who now directs the Brussels-based European Strategic and Intelligence Center. But he was dubious there would be much change in intelligence agencies’ real-world behavior.

“Everyone swears on the Bible,” Moniquet said. “And after that it’s business as usual.”

This week alone, there have been headlines in the European press about the U.S. scooping up millions of French telephone records and perhaps listening in on Merkel’s calls. A British newspaper said it obtained a confidential memo indicating that the personal communications of up to 35 foreign leaders may have been subject to U.S snooping in 2006.

On Friday, Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy said he had instructed his foreign minister to summon the U.S. ambassador in Spain to obtain information on news reports that Spain has been a target of U.S. spying, but insisted that his government was unaware of any cases.

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