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Inside the Beltway

Washington politics and government with a New Mexico flavor

Roxanne “Rocky” Lara named to list of elite candidates by DCCC

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Roxanne “Rocky” Lara, a Carlsbad Democrat aiming to unseat Republican Rep. Steve Pearce in the November election, got a campaign boost today when the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee named her as one of 16 candidates with a shot at turning congressional seats from “Red to Blue.”

The DCCC’s Red to Blue program highlights what the organization views as the top Democratic campaigns across the country, and offers them financial, communications, grassroots, and strategic support. The program is designed to introduce Democratic supporters to new, competitive candidates in order to help expand the fundraising base for these campaigns.

According to Lara’s campaign, the designation means “she has surpassed demanding fundraising, organization and infrastructure goals, and skillfully demonstrated to voters that she is a problem-solver who will strengthen the middle class.”

DCCC Chairman Steve Israel said: “As a local community leader, Rocky Lara has balanced budgets and fought for good jobs in southern New Mexico, and she has built a well-deserved reputation as a problem-solver.”

It’s been a good couple of months for Lara’s campaign. In January, she reported raising more money for the quarter than Pearce, although Pearce’s war chest — at more than $1 million – still dwarfed Lara’s, which stood at about $227,000.

Pearce, a tireless campaigner who has spent a decade in Congress, historically runs very strongly in his southern New Mexico district and wins by large margins. This is shaping up to be the congressional race to watch in New Mexico this year.

 

 

 

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