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Out and About

The quirky people, places and events that make this the City Different

Origami in metal visits the Botanical Garden on Museum Hill

Sculpture by Kevin Box
Sculpture by Kevin Box
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  • Sculpture by Kevin Box

  • Sculpture by Kevin Box

  • Sculpture by Kevin Box

  • Sculpture by Kevin Box

  • Sculpture by Kevin Box

  • Sculpture by Kevin Box

  • Sculpture by Kevin Box

Maybe you didn’t make it to the free Community Day at the Santa Fe Botanical Garden on Museum Hill on Sunday. Something about pellets of snow spitting in your face, riding a howling wind, can discourage the hardiest soul from a garden tour.

But we’re here to report that a few bushes, fruit trees and creeping plants are in bloom, ready to greet you on a warmer, sunnier day. And a new sculpture exhibit by Santa Fe resident Kevin Box, “Origami in the Garden,” adds a wry and graceful touch to the natural growth. Subjects range from a stolid bison to prancing horses to giant scissors to a variety of birds perching and soaring. (Just imagine the photos with sun shining on the objects.)

The pieces echo the paper folds of origami in a metal medium, made through lost wax casting and fabrication techniques, according to the Botanical Garden website.

Also on that page, Kevin Box is quoted about his art: “What inspires me about origami is its simple metaphor for life. We all begin with a blank page, what we choose to do with it is what matters and the possibilities are endless.”

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McDonald Rominger, who heads the FBI's office in northern Arizona, stands on the Navajo reservation near Gray Mountain, Ariz., on Monday. New FBI statistics show that the vast reservation saw a sharp increase in the murder rate in 2013 and finished the year with 42 homicides. (Felicia Fonseca/The Associated Press)
Number of Navajo homicides tops some metro areas

About 180,000 people live on the reservation that spans 27,000 square miles in Arizona, New Mexico and Utah

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