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Teens climb electronic dance music ladder

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Today’s music scene is not what it used to be: You don’t see a lot of people jamming out to “Twist and Shout” in the club anymore.

Trevin Barnhill, left, and Calvyn Clatanoff smile wide for Rising Tide Productions. (Rio Rancho Observer—ANGELA GROOM photo)

Trevin Barnhill, left, and Calvyn Clatanoff smile wide for Rising Tide Productions. (Rio Rancho Observer—ANGELA GROOM photo)

Rather, electronic dance music is swarming the headphones of teenagers and adults alike. Almost all of the modern music on the radio is electronically organized and mastered, whether there are real instruments or not. Electronic dance music, criticized by some non-fans as “computer music,” has become universally huge. People from every corner of the world attend gigantic festivals such as the Electric Daisy Carnival in Las Vegas, Nev., or the Sun City Music Festival in El Paso to see their favorite EDM DJ/producers.

Rio Rancho is home to an increasingly popular DJ/producer duo who calls themselves, TC Squared. TC Squared represents the first initial of their names, Trevin Barnhill and Calvyn Clatanoff.

Barnhill and Clatanoff create mixes, mash-ups or originals in the House, Progressive House and Electro genres of EDM.

They’re among a young crowd of music makers — both are 18. Barnhill, at first, didn’t like electronic music at all because of his passion for “real” instruments. He played drums for nine years as well as guitar and piano. Clatanoff, on the other hand, had enjoyed EDM, but had always been an athlete interested in college baseball, not being a producer.

The two went to see the artist Hardwell in Salt Lake City. His performance sparked their passion. .

The duo got their start playing music for about 20 people in their basement, and then later played a show in front of more than 200 people at the Elk’s lodge at Barbara Loop and Sara Road. The two made $1,000 at the show, and realized they could get paid to do what they love to do: make music.

Some follow-up shows weren’t as encouraging, be it because of the mood of the crowd or other reasons. The show that confirmed their dream was worth pursuing was at an event called Tri-School. Like most people who pursue success, the duo has experienced “haters,” with support in the beginning coming from only close friends and family.

They began working harder and enlisting the help of those who supported them from the beginning. Recently, they recruited the help of a photography/film production studio, Rising Tide Productions, to document their journey.

TC Squared has big plans for the future, with four shows coming up in the next few months.

They will play at the Sweet Tooth Featuring Milk N’ Cookies event on Friday, June 6, at Gravity Nightclub off of Fourth Street and Solar Road in Albuquerque. The Revival Festival is July 18 in Santa Fe. They’ll perform at Hill Thrill Four on July 26 in Las Vegas, N.M. The S3C3 Statehood Summer Sound Celebration 3 in Durango, Colo., is Aug. 1.

Follow their Twitter @TCSquared_ and check out their Facebook page at TCSquared.

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