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Auto sales trump previous positions

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David Gebara of Rocky Mountain Motor Co. has cycled through a number of careers. (Glen Rosales/For the Albuquerque Journal)

David Gebara of Rocky Mountain Motor Co. has cycled through a number of careers. (Glen Rosales/For the Albuquerque Journal)

David Gebara has seen the world from the back of a bucking bronc and plumbed the earth’s depths as a uranium shaft inspector.

But he’s found his niche selling cars from his Rocky Mountain Motor Co. dealership.

Gebara, as Grants native, got his start in the business in 1987 as an auto wholesaler, a career he created when he got tired of moving around while working as a buyer for a construction company.

It was in that latter position that he really got his start, having to sell off a few company vehicles when they were no longer needed.

The wholesale business became quite lucrative as Gebara built up a steady clientele, specializing in, among other things, Jaguars.

“For awhile, I was selling the most Jaguars in town,” he said. “I was getting them from California and I had a big warehouse that I put them in.”

But as the availability of vehicles dried up, the wholesale market tightened, Gebara said.

“It was getting so hard to buy the cars at auction that I wasn’t making any money,” he said.

So about eight years ago, he decided to help out a friend at Rocky Mountain.

“He wasn’t able to make a go of it and I just kept it going,” Gebara said.

Transitioning to a dealership that had to serve customers was kind of difficult, but he was able to find a top-notch manager in Dennis Lee who helped him with the transition.

“He takes care of all the hard stuff,” Gebara said. “When I retire, I’m going to give the whole business to him, that’s how much I think of him.”

Gebara is an Eastern New Mexico University graduate, earning a business degree in three years while also participating in the rodeo program there.

He worked the professional rodeo circuit for several years before hooking up with Phillips Uranium out of Crownpoint, dropping thousands of feet underground to get his job done.

“Sometimes 4,300 feet underground,” Gebara said. “I almost quit the first time I ever went down.”

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