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The quirky people, places and events that make this the City Different

“Pull of the Moon” comes to Santa Fe from the remote Coyote Canyon

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Shards ground down to fine dust from Chinese porcelain sent by artist Ai Weiwei for the art installation "Pull of the Moon" are on display at the Museum of Contemporary Native Art in Santa Fe. (Jackie Jadrnak/Journal)

Shards ground down to fine dust from Chinese porcelain sent by artist Ai Weiwei for the art installation “Pull of the Moon” are on display at the Museum of Contemporary Native Art in Santa Fe. (Jackie Jadrnak/Journal)

Coyote Canyon came to Santa Fe Wednesday — or at least a feel for its temporary art installation did.

Remnants and a record of the Navajo TIME (Temporary Installation Made for the Environment) project, “Pull of the Moon,” were unveiled at the Museum of Native Contemporary Art in Santa Fe. It included an industrial-looking construction of pipes and more that were fashioned into the frame of a cornstalk. That was what was left after a vase centered in a circular geometry ot symbols was burned in the remote location on the Navajo Nation.

“Corn is the soul of the Navajo people,” artist Bert Benally said Wednesday. “So that’s what’s left.”

The installation included a contribution from Chinese dissident artist Ai Weiwei, who designed a pattern of bicycles within a rounded space, with their white outlines created from dust ground down from porcelain, shards of which are on display in the museum.

Benally also provided a “soundscape,” together with German sound artist Robert Henke, in the gallery that he said was similar to what was played at the TIME installation. At various times, chants and drumming could be detected in the collage of sound.

A documentary of the making of “Pull of the Moon” by Daniel Hyde and Blackhorse Lowe will be playing at the museum on Wednesdays through Fridays until the end of the month, and then again from Aug. 21-Oct. 16.

And from 5-9 p.m. Friday and 10 am..-5 p.m. Saturday, July 18-19, a full-dome immersive landscape of the

This metal cornstalk is one of the few physical remnants of the "Pull of the Moon" temporary art installation. It was on display Wednesday during a reception at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts. (Jackie Jadrnak/Journal)

This metal cornstalk is one of the few physical remnants of the “Pull of the Moon” temporary art installation. It was on display Wednesday during a reception at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts. (Jackie Jadrnak/Journal)

temporary art installation will be showing on Museum Hill. The dome reaches all the way to the ground so is able to seal out light, making the video viewable during the day.

“There are only three domes like this in the world,” said Eileen Braziel, coordinator and curator for the TIME project, which was put together in conjunction with the Navajo Nation Museum and New Mexico Arts. That latter agency, which bought the dome, will be taking it around the state for others to experience the event.

As for the installation itself, most signs of it blew away within a day, as was intended.

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