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AP report points to Russian involvement in downing of Flight 17

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This file photo shows the Buk M2 missile system at a military show in Zhukovsky outside Moscow, Russia, in June 2010. A Buk launcher can fire up to an altitude of 72,000 feet. (Mikhail Metzel/The Associated Press)

This file photo shows the Buk M2 missile system at a military show in Zhukovsky outside Moscow, Russia, in June 2010. A Buk launcher can fire up to an altitude of 72,000 feet. (Mikhail Metzel/The Associated Press)

SNIZHNE, Ukraine – It was lunchtime when a tracked launcher with four SA-11 surface-to-air missiles rolled into town and parked on Karapetyan Street. Fifteen hundred miles to the west, passengers were checking in for Malaysia Airlines Flight 17.

It had been a noisy day in this eastern Ukrainian town. Plenty of military equipment was moving through. But still it was hard to miss the bulky missile system, also known as a Buk M-1. It left deep tread marks in the asphalt as it rumbled by in a small convoy.

The vehicles stopped in front of journalists from The Associated Press. A man wearing unfamiliar fatigues, speaking with a distinctive Russian accent, checked to make sure they weren’t filming. The convoy then moved on, destination unknown in the heart of eastern Ukraine’s pro-Russia rebellion.

Three hours later, people six miles west of Snizhne heard loud noises. And then they saw pieces of twisted metal – and bodies – fall from the sky.

Independent military analysts said Wednesday that the size, spread, shape and number of shrapnel impacts visible in an AP photograph of a piece of the wreckage all point to a missile system like the SA-11 Buk. (Dmitry Lovetsky/The Associated Press)

Independent military analysts said Wednesday that the size, spread, shape and number of shrapnel impacts visible in an AP photograph of a piece of the wreckage all point to a missile system like the SA-11 Buk. (Dmitry Lovetsky/The Associated Press)

The rebel leadership in Donetsk has repeatedly and publicly denied any responsibility for the downing of Flight 17. Sergei Kavtaradze, a spokesman for rebel leader Alexander Borodai, repeated to AP on Friday that no rebel units had weapons capable of shooting that high and said any suggestions to the contrary are part of an information war aimed at undermining the insurgents’ cause.

Nevertheless, the denials are increasingly challenged by accounts of residents, observations of journalists on the ground and statements by one rebel official. The Ukrainian government has also provided purported communications intercepts it says show rebel involvement in the shoot-down.

A highly placed rebel, speaking to AP this week, admitted that a unit based in the hometown of ousted President Viktor Yanukovych, made up of both Russians and Ukrainians, was involved in the firing of an SA-11 from near Snizhne. The rebel said he could not be named because he was contradicting the rebels’ official line.

The rebels believed they were targeting a Ukrainian military plane, this person said. Instead, they hit the passenger jet flying from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur. All 298 people aboard were killed.

Intercepted phone conversations released by the Ukrainian government appear to back up the contention the rebels who fired were unaware the aircraft was a passenger jet. In those tapes, the first rebels to reach the scene can be heard swearing when they see the number of bodies and the insignia of Malaysia Airlines.

Ukraine immediately blamed the rebels for the shooting. In an interview in Kiev this week, the Ukrainian counterterrorism chief, Vitaly Nayda, gave AP the government’s version of the events of July 17. He said the account was based on information from intercepts, spies and resident tips.

Nayda laid the blame fully on Russia: He said the missile launcher came from Russia and was operated by Russians. The Russian Foreign Ministry on Friday declined to comment on either charge. Moscow has continually denied involvement.

U.S. officials have blamed Russia for creating the “conditions” for the downing of the plane, but have offered no evidence the missile came from Russia or that Russia was involved directly.

According to Nayda, at 1 a.m. on July 17, the launcher rolled into Ukraine aboard a flatbed truck. By 9 a.m., he said, the launcher had reached Donetsk, the main rebel stronghold 125 miles from the border. In Donetsk, it is presumed to have been off-loaded from the flatbed and started to move in a convoy on its own.

Nayda said the Buk turned back east toward Snizhne. Townspeople who spoke to AP said it rolled into Snizhne around lunchtime. “On that day, there was a lot of military equipment moving about in town,” recalled Tatyana Germash, a 55-year-old accountant, interviewed Monday, four days after the attack.

Valery Sakharov, a 64-year-old retired miner, pointed out the spot where he saw the missile launcher. “The Buk was parked on Karapetyan Street at midday, but later it left; I don’t know where,” he said. “Look – it even left marks on the asphalt.”

Even before the plane was downed, AP had reported on the presence of the missile launcher in the town July 17.

In this Thursday, July 17, 2014 file photo, people inspect the crash site of a passenger plane near the village of Grabovo, Ukraine. All 298 people aboard the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 traveling from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur were killed.  (The Associated Press/Dmitry Lovetsky)

In this Thursday, July 17, 2014 file photo, people inspect the crash site of a passenger plane near the village of Grabovo, Ukraine. All 298 people aboard the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 traveling from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur were killed. (The Associated Press/Dmitry Lovetsky)

Here is what that dispatch said: “An Associated Press reporter on Thursday saw seven rebel-owned tanks parked at a gas station outside the eastern Ukrainian town of Snizhne. In the town, he also observed a Buk missile system, which can fire missiles up to an altitude of 22,000 meters (72,000 feet).”

AP journalists saw the Buk moving through town at 1:05 p.m. The vehicle, which carried four 18-foot missiles, was in a convoy with two civilian cars.

The convoy stopped. A man in sand-colored camouflage without identifying insignia – different from the green camouflage the rebels normally wear – approached the journalists. The man wanted to make sure they had not recorded any images of the missile launcher. Satisfied they hadn’t, the convoy moved on.

About three hours later, at 4:18 p.m., according to a recording from an intercepted phone call that has been released by Ukraine’s government, the Buk’s crew snapped to attention when a spotter called in a report of an incoming airplane.

“A bird is flying to you,” the spotter tells the rebel, identified by the Ukrainians as Igor Bezler, an insurgent commander the Ukrainian government asserts is also a Russian intelligence officer. The man identified as Bezler responds: “Reconnaissance plane or a big one?”

“I can’t see behind the clouds. Too high,” the spotter replies.

Bezler, contacted on Friday by AP, denied any connection to the attack on the plane. “I did not shoot down the Malaysia Airlines plane. I did not have the physical capabilities to do so,” he declared.

At about 4:20 p.m., in the town of Torez, six miles west of Snizhne, residents heard loud noises. Some reported hearing two blasts, while others recall only one.

At 4:40 p.m., in another intercepted call released by Ukraine, the man identified as Bezler tells his superior that the unit had shot down a plane. “Just shot down a plane. It went down beyond Yenakiieve,” the man says.

The U.S. Embassy in Kiev said specialists in the intelligence community have deemed the call authentic.

As for the Buk, Nayda said, intelligence suggests it went back on the move shortly after the attack. That very night, he said, it crossed the border, back into Russia.

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