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Author Archives: Elaine Tassy / Journal Staff Writer

Virginia Perez-Ortega and Sandro Anguiano of Enlace Comunitario weighed in on the organization’s recent decision to launch a program that would teach those who choose to use violence in their relationship alternatives to battering their partners. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal)

Enlace’s new initiative targets Spanish-speaking batterers

Enlace Comunitario, an organization that has for 14 years helped Spanish-speaking women survive crises of domestic violence, will this fall embark on new terrain: designing a program aimed at the batterers.

Antoinette Sedillo Lopez in her office at Enlace Comunitario, where she took over as the new executive director in January. (Dean Hanson/Albuquerque Journal)

Ex-law school dean follows new dream

Antoinette Sedillo Lopez had what she considered an amazing, cushy job as a professor and then dean at the University of New Mexico School of Law, specializing in a range of areas, including family law.

Luis A. Ramos Jr., center, hugs Cindy Romero, mother of Martin Romero, who passed away in January at age 14. Martin’s father, John Romero, stands at right. Ramo received an award from the Albuquerque Public School Board for his work with the Home Hospital Program at a meeting Wednesday. (Marla Brose/Albuquerque Journal)

APS program takes school to home-bound students

When 14-year-old Martin Romero, a baseball lover and Rio Grande High School freshman, was diagnosed with a brain tumor in September 2013 and then died from it only four months later, his parents took it hard.

A barren lot near the intersection of Central Avenue and 60th Street bears descansos honoring Kee Thompson, rear, and Allison Gorman, front. The two men were beaten to death in the lot last month. The descansos are a traditional tribute usually erected at the site of an often violent death. (Jim Thompson/Albuquerque Journal)

Descansos pay tribute to dead, comfort to mourners

James Yazzie, a 63-year-old Navajo man from Church Rock, sits in his car in a gravel and dirt lot near the intersection of Central Avenue and 60th Street, where a savage assault recently made national headlines.

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