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Art

Carved wood, paint and fiber cats by Felipe Benito Archuleta, top row, and a smaller bobcat by Ron Archuleta Rodriguez are in the exhibit "Wooden Menagerie: Made in New Mexico" at the Museum of International Folk Art. (Courtesy of the Museum of International Folk Art)

On exhibit

With a number of new exhibits at Albuquerque and Santa Fe museums, the world seems to have come closer, within easy reach of residents and visitors.

"Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning" at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture includes this Zuni frog. (Eddie Moore/Albuquerque Journal)

Turquoise dreams

Gem of the water and the sky, turquoise bedecks babies, bodies and buildings from Cerrillos to China.

The International UFO Museum & Research Center covers the 1947 event for which Roswell is best known with exhibits and lectures. (Courtesy of City Of Roswell)

Visitors welcome

Roswell may be best-known for an event that still resonates around the world more than 65 years after some kind of object crashed on a ranch outside the city in southeastern New Mexico.

Guests admire the large retablos exhibit at last year's Spanish Market in Santa Fe. (Dean Hanson/Albuquerque Journal)

Four cultural art markets showcase Southwest’s treasures

Four of the Southwest’s best-known and most beloved markets displaying artwork from near and far will be in Santa Fe between May and September, showcasing the art of Native American and Hispanic artisans.

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