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Native American

Harold Simpson, top, a full-blooded Navajo tour guide, walks through the stark landscape of Monument Valley on the Utah-Arizona border. Simpson stands in the middle of a controversy between tourism and preserving the land. (Wally Skalij/Los Angeles Times/MCT)

Monument Valley tourism spurs conflict

By John M. Glionna / Los Angeles Times

Remote Monument Valley pits Navajo elders concerned with preserving area’s spiritual significance against burgeoning tourism development

Taos Pueblo is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. (Courtesy of Lenny Foster/Taos Pueblo)

Taos is so close and yet so far from the ordinary

By Elaine Tassy / Journal Staff Writer

Feasting at the country’s oldest pueblo, trekking mountains with a llama along to lug the heavy stuff, hiking in 242,500 acres of natural wilderness, and then kayaking the Rio Grande?

"Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning" at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture includes this Zuni frog. (Eddie Moore/Albuquerque Journal)

Turquoise dreams

By Kathaleen Roberts / Journal Staff Writer

Gem of the water and the sky, turquoise bedecks babies, bodies and buildings from Cerrillos to China.

The stone ruins of a 500-year-old Indian village highlight a visit to Jemez Historic Site. (Courtesy of Richard Hasbrouck)

History on the spot

By Emily Van Cleve / For the Journal

New Mexico’s diverse history, reflected in ancient Native American kivas, Spanish Colonial churches and 19th-century military forts, is preserved and protected through the New Mexico Historic Site system.

Buffalo dancers at a recent Zuni Pueblo parade. (Courtesy of Zuni Tourism)

NM’s pueblos welcome visitors for festivals, feast days

By Donna Olmstead / Journal Staff Writer

With open invitations to visitors, feast days and festivals at any of the 19 pueblos in New Mexico offer immersion into another culture, if just for a day.

White Mountain Apache Crown Dancers from north central Arizona perform outside the Pit on Saturday. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal)

Native pride

By Patrick Lohmann / Journal Staff Writer

Gathering of Nations draws hundreds of tribes

A woman heads toward the exterior ladder of a house on the Acoma Pueblo. (Roberto E. Rosales/Albuquerque Journal)

Acoma people fold old traditions into present

By Elaine Tassy / Journal Staff Writer

ACOMA — A dark-haired woman wearing jeans and a striped shirt climbs a ladder to enter her adobe home on this small Native American pueblo, carrying a bag of food from McDonald’s.

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