Login for full access to ABQJournal.com



New Users: Subscribe here


Close

Culture

The International UFO Museum & Research Center covers the 1947 event for which Roswell is best known with exhibits and lectures. (Courtesy of City Of Roswell)

Visitors welcome

Roswell may be best-known for an event that still resonates around the world more than 65 years after some kind of object crashed on a ranch outside the city in southeastern New Mexico.

"Turquoise, Water, Sky: The Stone and Its Meaning" at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture includes this Zuni frog. (Eddie Moore/Albuquerque Journal)

Turquoise dreams

Gem of the water and the sky, turquoise bedecks babies, bodies and buildings from Cerrillos to China.

Guests admire the large retablos exhibit at last year's Spanish Market in Santa Fe. (Dean Hanson/Albuquerque Journal)

Four cultural art markets showcase Southwest’s treasures

Four of the Southwest’s best-known and most beloved markets displaying artwork from near and far will be in Santa Fe between May and September, showcasing the art of Native American and Hispanic artisans.

Carved wood, paint and fiber cats by Felipe Benito Archuleta, top row, and a smaller bobcat by Ron Archuleta Rodriguez are in the exhibit "Wooden Menagerie: Made in New Mexico" at the Museum of International Folk Art. (Courtesy of the Museum of International Folk Art)

On exhibit

With a number of new exhibits at Albuquerque and Santa Fe museums, the world seems to have come closer, within easy reach of residents and visitors.

Native American flutist R. Carlos Nakai performs with the Abiquiu Chamber Music Festival on Sept. 7.

In concert

You’ll find plenty of affordable opportunities to hear great music this summer at festivals from Farmington to Abiquiu and Santa Fe to Albuquerque.

The stone ruins of a 500-year-old Indian village highlight a visit to Jemez Historic Site. (Courtesy of Richard Hasbrouck)

History on the spot

New Mexico’s diverse history, reflected in ancient Native American kivas, Spanish Colonial churches and 19th-century military forts, is preserved and protected through the New Mexico Historic Site system.

An opera patron sets the table for a tailgate party with friends. Tailgating, especially on opening night, is a favorite longtime tradition at the Santa Fe Opera. (Eddie Moore/Albuquerque Journal)

A beguiling pairing

The Santa Fe Opera always presents five operas during its summer season, but this summer there’s a slightly different twist to the schedule. For the first time since 1993, the opera presents two short operas in one evening.

Top