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New DynaTheater film teaches about power of volcanoes

Earth is a planet born of fire.

For billions of years, volcanoes have helped create the world we know.

From the continents to the air we breathe and even life itself, all have their origins in fire.

These processes have created extraordinary ecosystems and wildlife habitats. With over 500 active volcanoes, the Earth is bursting at the seams with these forces of mass construction.

The story of volcanoes is told in the film, “Volcanoes: The Fires of Creation,” which is showing at the DynaTheater at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science in Albuquerque.

“Volcanoes have been an integral part of the ecosystem,” says Mike Pacheco, DynaTheater manager. “The film explains the science behind the importance of volcanoes.”

The film follows intrepid explorer Carsten Peter, as he dodges boulders at the edge of an active volcano in Indonesia, descends to a lava lake in Vanuatu and visits the incredible mineral deposit fields in Ethiopia.

He also travels across the globe to see the archaeological ghost town of Pompeii and witness the devastating effects of the recent Kilauea eruption in Hawaii.

Pacheco says the movie was filmed around the world.

“There’s a lot of Hawaii in the film,” he says. “So it’s very relevant to what’s been happening around the world this year. We felt that adding this film into our rotation would help teach audiences about volcanoes. Hearing about them can be pretty scary, but the film does a good job of educating.”

The museum also has an area where visitors can learn about New Mexico’s own volcanoes, Pacheco adds.

“I remember going to the museum as a kid and learning about our volcanoes,” he says. “We are lucky to live in New Mexico. Volcanoes built our geology and it was all due to past volcanic activity.”

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