Delivery alert

There may be an issue with the delivery of your newspaper. This alert will expire at NaN. Click here for more info.

Recover password

Bill would boost consumer privacy

Copyright © 2019 Albuquerque Journal

SANTA FE – A proposal headed to the Legislature this year is aimed at giving New Mexico consumers more control over the personal information that’s collected and sold by businesses.

Sen. Michael Padilla, D-Albuquerque, said he hopes the 31-page bill starts a conversation on how to protect people’s privacy in the age of online shopping and social media. But he said it’s important to avoid going too far with burdensome regulations.

“I don’t wan to stifle innovation or creativity from a lot of these organizations,” Padilla told the Journal. “We have to find a balance.”

His proposal, Senate Bill 176, would establish that consumers have a right to request from a business the kind of information on them that it has collected or sold.

Businesses would also have to notify consumers about the information they’re collecting and allow people to opt out of the sale of their data.

And if a hacker stole consumer information from a business, the person would have the right file a lawsuit and recover damages, in some circumstances.

The proposed law would be called the Consumer Information Privacy Act.

Padilla said he is open to amendments and he hopes consumers, technology companies and others will weigh in.

“I tried to throw as much spaghetti on the wall” as possible, he said. “I want this to work for the consumer, I want it to work for the companies in this industry, and I want to make sure it can be regulated and managed.”

Several businesses and business groups contacted by the Journal said they either hadn’t seen the legislation or weren’t ready to comment.

Similar proposals have popped up in other states, Padilla said. California recently passed a consumer privacy act, though Padilla said he believes that law went too far.

A 60-day session of the New Mexico Legislature begins Tuesday. Democrats hold majorities in both chambers.

AlertMe

Advertisement

TOP |