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Degree of Difficulty

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Tell Us: What Is the Most Daunting Golf Hole in the Area?

What is the hardest golf hole in the metro area?

There it is, in black and white, the homework assignment we hand out today to every pro, assistant pro, scratch golfer, single-digit handicapper and weekend hacker who’s reading this.

What is the most difficult hole?


Send comments to the Journal at sports@abqjournal.com. Readers have until the end of July to respond.TIGER fires caddie

Tiger Woods parts ways with caddie Steve Williams, ending a 12-year relationship
D5

Glynnis Price has the lead at the Women’s City Amateur D4

And, how exactly do we define it?

In a few weeks, we will write about the hole. Despite the input we are soliciting, the final decision will be ours – ours meaning myself and fellow Journal golf writer Mark Smith – and ours alone.

We also hope to give readers a list of the toughest par 3s, par 4s and par 5s that can be found among our local zip codes.

First, let us discuss the parameters.

Any and every golf course within 30 minutes of the Big-I can be considered. That includes all the city-run courses in Albuquerque, as well as Desert Greens and the UNM Championship Course.

It includes private tracks such as Tanoan and Albuquerque Country Club.

It includes the pueblo-run courses – Isleta Eagle, Sandia, Twin Warriors and Santa Ana. Plus Paa-Ko Ridge, Chamisa Hills in Rio Rancho, Four Hills and Tierra del Sol in Belen.

There are no restrictions.

I will admit, how an individual defines a tough hole is a subjective thing.

Are we talking about the hardest hole as defined on the scorecard? Or the hole that simply chews you up and spits you out every time you step on that tee box?

It’s a fair question. Let me answer it this way – both points of view are relevant.

For instance, if I were on your side of the glass today, I’d choose the par-4 10th at Twin Warriors.

First, there’s the blind tee shot – a shot that almost always fools me no matter how many times I’ve played that hole. Yes, that little red-and-white barber pole tells me where I should aim, but I can’t count how many balls I’ve lost in the junk to the left of the heavy rough at No. 10.

Distance is a factor; you can drive it so far as to pummel the ball through the end of the fairway and create an issue. If you hit a poor drive, there’s no hope of reaching the green with your second shot. There’s healthy rough on both sides of the fairway.

Next, there is the second-shot approach, to an elevated green. Players must carry a large ravine that cuts about 50 yards in front of the green. Of course, that’s not in play for the better golfers, but for most of us, visually you can’t help but think about it as you line up the shot. A large, deep bunker protects the green in the front right. It’s a tough green to find, even from the middle of the fairway.

Aesthetically, it’s a beautiful hole. And treacherous. And wonderfully designed. You make par there, you’re golfing your ball.

But having said all that, I would choose it for this reason and no other – it drives me completely insane.

I’m about a 15 handicap who can hit it a pretty fair distance. For now, I can still play from a back set of tees with no issue. But no matter what I do at the 10th, I almost always leave with no better than a 6.

Put another way: The expletives fly out of my mouth faster at that hole than any other. I hate that stinking hole.

Anyway, the exercise for readers today is simply to tell us what you think the hardest hole is. And also, briefly explain your choice to us. We’ll perhaps share some reader feedback when I write this story in a few weeks.

In the meantime, think about it, and get back to us (see the attached information box).

And most of all, have some fun with this. We certainly are.
Degree of Difficulty

What do you think?
Send comments to the Journal at sports@abqjournal.com. Readers have until the end of July to respond.

TIGER fires caddie
Tiger Woods parts ways with caddie Steve Williams, ending a 12-year relationshipD5

Glynnis Price has the lead at the Women’s City Amateur D4

CITY GOLF
— This article appeared on page D1 of the Albuquerque JournalTiger Woods parts ways with caddie Steve Williams, ending a 12-year relationship
D5Glynnis Price has the lead at the Women’s City Amateur D4

And, how exactly do we define it?

In a few weeks, we will write about the hole. Despite the input we are soliciting, the final decision will be ours – ours meaning myself and fellow Journal golf writer Mark Smith – and ours alone.

We also hope to give readers a list of the toughest par 3s, par 4s and par 5s that can be found among our local zip codes.

First, let us discuss the parameters.

Any and every golf course within 30 minutes of the Big-I can be considered. That includes all the city-run courses in Albuquerque, as well as Desert Greens and the UNM Championship Course.

It includes private tracks such as Tanoan and Albuquerque Country Club.

It includes the pueblo-run courses – Isleta Eagle, Sandia, Twin Warriors and Santa Ana. Plus Paa-Ko Ridge, Chamisa Hills in Rio Rancho, Four Hills and Tierra del Sol in Belen.

There are no restrictions.

I will admit, how an individual defines a tough hole is a subjective thing.

Are we talking about the hardest hole as defined on the scorecard? Or the hole that simply chews you up and spits you out every time you step on that tee box?

It’s a fair question. Let me answer it this way – both points of view are relevant.

For instance, if I were on your side of the glass today, I’d choose the par-4 10th at Twin Warriors.

First, there’s the blind tee shot – a shot that almost always fools me no matter how many times I’ve played that hole. Yes, that little red-and-white barber pole tells me where I should aim, but I can’t count how many balls I’ve lost in the junk to the left of the heavy rough at No. 10.

Distance is a factor; you can drive it so far as to pummel the ball through the end of the fairway and create an issue. If you hit a poor drive, there’s no hope of reaching the green with your second shot. There’s healthy rough on both sides of the fairway.

Next, there is the second-shot approach, to an elevated green. Players must carry a large ravine that cuts about 50 yards in front of the green. Of course, that’s not in play for the better golfers, but for most of us, visually you can’t help but think about it as you line up the shot. A large, deep bunker protects the green in the front right. It’s a tough green to find, even from the middle of the fairway.

Aesthetically, it’s a beautiful hole. And treacherous. And wonderfully designed. You make par there, you’re golfing your ball.

But having said all that, I would choose it for this reason and no other – it drives me completely insane.

I’m about a 15 handicap who can hit it a pretty fair distance. For now, I can still play from a back set of tees with no issue. But no matter what I do at the 10th, I almost always leave with no better than a 6.

Put another way: The expletives fly out of my mouth faster at that hole than any other. I hate that stinking hole.

Anyway, the exercise for readers today is simply to tell us what you think the hardest hole is. And also, briefly explain your choice to us. We’ll perhaps share some reader feedback when I write this story in a few weeks.

In the meantime, think about it, and get back to us (see the attached information box).

And most of all, have some fun with this. We certainly are.
Degree of Difficulty

What do you think?
Send comments to the Journal at sports@abqjournal.com. Readers have until the end of July to respond.

TIGER fires caddie
Tiger Woods parts ways with caddie Steve Williams, ending a 12-year relationshipD5

Glynnis Price has the lead at the Women’s City Amateur D4

CITY GOLF
— This article appeared on page D1 of the Albuquerque Journal

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