'A different approach': Santa Fe's Alternative Response Unit represents an evolution of care - Albuquerque Journal

‘A different approach’: Santa Fe’s Alternative Response Unit represents an evolution of care

Ramos Tsosie, left, a mobile integrated health paramedic for the Santa Fe Fire Department, helps Skyra Cobra set up a medical appointment at her camp along the Rail Trail near Second Street in Santa Fe, on Thursday. Tsosie, a crew of paramedics and a case manager are part of the city’s new Alternative Response Unit. (Eddie Moore/Albuquerque Journal)

Copyright © 2021 Albuquerque Journal

SANTA FE – Underneath a St. Francis Drive overpass, a group of people were making their home in an arroyo. Their tents huddled near the back wall of the overpass, sheltered by nearby bushes and cardboard stacked against concrete pillars.

The people were living in the arroyo for about a month before being asked to leave because police suspected them of vandalism in the vicinity. But, instead of being shuffled from place to place, the city’s Alternative Response Unit offered help.

William Brunson, right, an EMS Captain with the Santa Fe Fire Department’s new Alternative Response Unit, tries to help a woman on Thursday who is in danger of being charged with criminal trespassing for parking her motorhome at the Santa Fe Suites in Santa Fe. (Eddie Moore/Albuquerque Journal)

The unit is a partnership between the Santa Fe Police Department and the Santa Fe Fire Department. It screens dispatch calls to see where it can provide services that extend beyond a typical police response. The unit, which comprises a caseworker, a paramedic and a police officer, and aims to help people in a variety of issues stemming from mental health to homelessness, went live in May.

“It’s really sort of what this big evolution of health care is looking toward – how to get out of the brick-and-mortar institutions, and take care to where people are,” said Andres Mercado, mobile integrated health officer with the Santa Fe Fire Department.

William Brunson, right, an EMS Captain with the Santa Fe Fire Department’s new Alternative Response Unit, tries to help homeless people relocate from under a St. Francis Drive bridge on Thursday. Police had just told the people they had only a few hours to leave this spot. (Eddie Moore/Albuquerque Journal)

The purpose of the unit is to help handle the calls that straddle the intersection between public health and public safety, Mercado said. Currently, the unit runs three days a week, with plans to move up to four days a week.

In addition, due to the unit’s success, the departments are interviewing candidates for a second unit.

The unit costs about $400,000 to run and the whole program costs about $2 million, just on the fire department’s side, according to Assistant Fire Chief Brian Moya. The program also includes caseworkers in the office who do not go out with the unit.

Despite the program’s cost, it still saves the city money. Mayor Alan Webber said about two years ago that the city was spending $3.4 million a year chasing encampments across the city. Now, the unit can help get to the root of issues to help prevent homelessness from occurring in the first place.

“This is really a more systematic approach to getting different outcomes,” Webber said. “And so, dollar for dollar, you’re getting a very different approach and a different series of results.”

In 2015, Mercado said, about 18% of the fire department’s calls for service included the same 250 people. These people often needed help with their mental health, health care and finding a place to live. Of Santa Fe’s 80,000 residents, these calls comprised less than 1% of the city’s population.

Back under the overpass, Emergency Medical Services Capt. William Brunson asked the individuals if they needed help finding a new place to live. One of the men said he had been homeless for over three years, and came to Santa Fe from New York.

In his tent, his three dogs barked at the paramedics as they made their way through the encampment, checking on people and offering their services. A sharps container sat on the ground next to the man’s tent and Brunson offered to get him a new one, but the man declined.

Brunson spoke with him some more and handed him a card with a caseworker’s contact information to help get him housed.

For Brunson and Mobile Integrated Health paramedic Ramos Tsosie, this was a typical day at work. The two worked together to help the people under the overpass gain access to community services so they wouldn’t be left without a place to go after being told to leave.

William Brunson, center, an EMS Captain with the Santa Fe Fire Department’s new Alternative Response Unit, talks with Santa Fe Police Officers Anthony Trujillo, left, and German Mena, as they try to help a woman on Thursday who may be charged with criminal trespassing for parking her motorhome at the Santa Fe Suites in Santa Fe. (Eddie Moore/Albuquerque Journal)

Most of the homeless people Brunson and Tsosie help are people they’ve met before. This knowledge, and relationships the paramedics build with people, helps them on the job. Knowing a person’s situation and backstory helps the two fully address their needs.

But they don’t just help the city’s homeless people. The two said they’ve also de-escalated fights in hotel rooms and people’s houses, as well as gone on welfare checks. In a recent call, the two helped a woman who was lying on the floor of her home, unresponsive from a stroke.

It’s their response, which can save someone’s life or give someone a place to live, that is helping the city get to the root of problems instead of treating symptoms, Mercado and Webber said. Whether it’s walking into a hotel room, parking lot or arroyo, Brunson and Tsosie provide an alternative way to make a difference in the city different.

Home » Journal North » Journal North Recent News » ‘A different approach’: Santa Fe’s Alternative Response Unit represents an evolution of care

Insert Question Legislature form in Legis only stories




Albuquerque Journal and its reporters are committed to telling the stories of our community.

• Do you have a question you want someone to try to answer for you? Do you have a bright spot you want to share?
   We want to hear from you. Please email yourstory@abqjournal.com

taboola desktop

ABQjournal can get you answers in all pages

 

Questions about the Legislature?
Albuquerque Journal can get you answers
Email addresses are used solely for verification and to speed the verification process for repeat questioners.
1
SITE Santa Fe awarded National Endowment for the Arts ...
Arts
The grant will support the upcoming ... The grant will support the upcoming exhibition, 'Going With the Flow: Art, Actions and Western Waters,' opening on April 14.
2
Santa Fe student selected to magazine's Junior Council
Arts
Viviana Garcia-Vélez, 11, chosen out of ... Viviana Garcia-Vélez, 11, chosen out of hundreds of applicants by weekly youth news publication The Week Junior.
3
Xeric Garden Club to host lecture
Arts
The Xeric Garden Club of Albuquerque ... The Xeric Garden Club of Albuquerque will hosting Laurel Ladwig as she speaks on the topic 'Share Space with Wildlife with a Backyard Refuge.'
4
The nitty gritty of Roth IRA conversions
ABQnews Seeker
Roth IRAs offer many benefits over ... Roth IRAs offer many benefits over traditional IRAs. I have written previous articles, encouraging readers to build their Roth IRAs through contributions or conversions. ...
5
Laguna Pueblo starts work on affordable housing project
ABQnews Seeker
The Laguna #3 affordable housing development, ... The Laguna #3 affordable housing development, which is set to complete in mid-2024, will be able to house 20 families.
6
'More like a home' than a hospital: Presbyterian's new ...
ABQnews Seeker
Departments and floors of the $170 ... Departments and floors of the $170 million tower will be opening on a weekly basis over the next two months.
7
Los Lunas seeks more funds for I-25 project
ABQnews Seeker
The village is about $51M short ... The village is about $51M short of fully funding the $141M phase
8
New cannabis delivery service enters ABQ market
ABQnews Seeker
Priscotty made its first delivery earlier ... Priscotty made its first delivery earlier this month
9
Sandia Area Federal Credit Union names new CFO
ABQnews Seeker
The announcement was made on Tuesday The announcement was made on Tuesday