Djokovic in limbo as he fights deportation from Australia - Albuquerque Journal

Djokovic in limbo as he fights deportation from Australia

Locked in a dispute over his COVID-19 vaccination status, Novak Djokovic was confined to an immigration detention hotel in Australia on Thursday as the No. 1 men’s tennis player in the world awaited a court ruling on whether he can compete in the Australian Open later this month.

Djokovic, a vocal skeptic of vaccines, had traveled to Australia after Victoria state authorities granted him a medical exemption to the country’s strict vaccination requirements. But when he arrived late Wednesday, the Australian Border Force rejected his exemption as invalid and barred him from entering the country.

A court hearing on his bid to stave off deportation was set for Monday, a week before the season’s first major tennis tournament is set to begin. The defending Australian Open champion is waiting it out in Melbourne at a secure hotel used by immigration officials to house asylum seekers and refugees.

Djokovic is hoping to overtake rivals Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer and win his 21st Grand Slam singles title, the most by any player in men’s tennis.

Djokovic’s securing of an exemption so that he could play triggered an uproar and allegations of special treatment in Australia, where people spent months in lockdown and endured harsh travel restrictions at the height of the pandemic.

After his long-haul flight, the tennis star spent the night at the airport trying to convince authorities he had the necessary documentation, to no avail.

“The rule is very clear,” Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said. “You need to have a medical exemption. He didn’t have a valid medical exemption. We make the call at the border, and that’s where it’s enforced.”

Health Minister Greg Hunt said the athlete’s visa was canceled after border officials reviewed Djokovic’s medical exemption and looked at “the integrity and the evidence behind it.”

The grounds on which he was granted an exemption were not immediately disclosed.

While Djokovic has steadfastly refused to say whether he has gotten any shots against the coronavirus, he has spoken out against vaccines, and it is widely presumed he would not have sought an exemption if he had been vaccinated.

A federal judge will take up the case next week. A lawyer for the government agreed the nine-time Australian Open champion should not be deported before then.

“I feel terrible since yesterday that they are keeping him as a prisoner. It’s not fair. It’s not human. I hope that he will win,” Djokovic’s mother, Dijana, said after speaking with him briefly by telephone from Belgrade.

She added: “Terrible, terrible accommodation. It’s just some small immigration hotel, if it’s a hotel at all.”

Australia’s home affairs minister, Karen Andrews, said Friday that Djokovic could fly out of the country on the first available flight.

“Can I say, firstly, that Mr. Djokovic is not being held captive in Australia. He is free to leave at any time that he chooses to do so,” Andrews said. “And Border Force will actually facilitate that.”

Serbian President Aleksandar Vucic has also spoken to Djokovic and said his government asked that the athlete be allowed to move to a house he has rented and “not to be in that infamous hotel.”

He said Djokovic has been treated differently from other players.

“I’m afraid that this overkill will continue,” Vucic said. “When you can’t beat someone, then you do such things.”

Border Force investigations were continuing into two other people who arrived in Australia for the tennis tournament, Andrews said.

Australia’s prime minister said the onus is on the traveler to have the proper documentation on arrival, and he rejected any suggestion that Djokovic was being singled out.

“One of the things the Border Force does is act on intelligence to direct their attention to potential arrivals,” he said. “When you get people making public statements about what they say they have, and they’re going to do, they draw significant attention to themselves.”

Anyone who does that, he said, “whether they’re a celebrity, a politician, a tennis player . . . they can expect to be asked questions more than others before you come.”

The medical-exemption applications from players, their teams and tennis officials were vetted by two independent panels of experts. An approved exemption allowed entry to the tournament.

Acceptable reasons for an exemption include major health conditions and serious reactions to a previous dose of the COVID-19 vaccine. A COVID-19 infection within the previous six months has also been widely reported to be grounds for an exemption, but that’s where interpretations appeared to differ between the federal level, which controls the border, and tennis and state health officials.

Former Australian Open tournament director and Davis Cup player Paul McNamee said the treatment of Djokovic was unfair.

“The guy played by the rules, he got his visa, he arrives, he’s a nine-time champion and whether people like it or not he’s entitled to fair play,” McNamee told the Australian Broadcasting Corp. “There’s no doubt there’s some disconnect between the state and the federal government.

“I hate to think politics are involved but it feels that way.”

Djokovic tested positive for the coronavirus in June 2020 after he played in a series of exhibition matches that he organized without social distancing amid the pandemic.

Critics questioned what grounds Djokovic could have for the exemption, while supporters argued he has a right to privacy and freedom of choice.

Many Australians who have struggled to obtain COVID-19 tests or have been forced into isolation saw a double standard.

Tension has grown amid another surge of COVID-19 in the country. Victoria state recorded six deaths and nearly 22,000 new cases on Thursday, the biggest one-day jump in the caseload since the pandemic began.

Australian Open tournament director Craig Tiley has defended the “completely legitimate application and process” and insisted there was no special treatment for Djokovic.

Twenty-six people connected with the tournament applied for a medical exemption and, Tiley said, only a “handful” were granted. None of those have been publicly identified.

___

Associated Press Writer Dusan Stojanovic in Belgrade, Serbia, and AP Sports Writer Dennis Passa in Australia contributed to this report.

___

More AP tennis: https://apnews.com/hub/tennis and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports


Albuquerque Journal and its reporters are committed to telling the stories of our community.

• Do you have a question you want someone to try to answer for you? Do you have a bright spot you want to share?
   We want to hear from you. Please email yourstory@abqjournal.com

Nativo Sponsored Content

taboola desktop

MORE ARTICLES LIKE THIS

1
MMA: Brown wins by TKO
Blogs
In Dallas, Albuquerque (Jackson-Wink) MMA welterweight ... In Dallas, Albuquerque (Jackson-Wink) MMA welterweight Chris “Breezy' Brown defeated Steve Jones by 3rd-round TKO (strikes to ground-and-pound) Friday night on an LFA card. ...
2
Djokovic's appeal of canceled visa moves to higher court
More News
Novak Djokovic's effort to play in ... Novak Djokovic's effort to play in the Australian Open despite being unvaccinated for COVID-19 moved to a higher court Saturday as the No. 1-ranked ...
3
Yanks' Balkovec, former UNM softball player, lives 'American dream' ...
Featured Sports
Rachel Balkovec is aware of the ... Rachel Balkovec is aware of the negativity in her social media feeds and tries to leave it there. Her sisters see it, too, and ...
4
Australian judge rules in Djokovic's favor
Pro
  MELBOURNE, Australia — An Australian ...   MELBOURNE, Australia — An Australian judge has reinstated tennis star Novak Djokovic's visa, which was canceled last week because he is unvaccinated. Circuit ...
5
Yanks' Balkovec, former UNM Lobo, to be first female ...
Pro
The New York Yankees are promoting ... The New York Yankees are promoting Rachel Balkovec to manager of the Low A Tampa Tarpons, making her the first woman to skipper a ...
6
Some say politics at play in Djokovic detention in ...
Pro
On the tennis court, Novak Djokovic's ... On the tennis court, Novak Djokovic's timing is perfect. But when the No. 1 player boarded a plane for Australia to play the first ...
7
Neely, big star for Farmington, Oklahoma, Dallas Cowboys, dies ...
Featured Sports
FARMINGTON – Longtime Dallas ... FARMINGTON – Longtime Dallas Cowboys great and Farmington High School graduate Ralph Neely d ...
8
Djokovic in limbo as he fights deportation from Australia
Pro
Locked in a dispute over his ... Locked in a dispute over his COVID-19 vaccination status, Novak Djokovic was confined to an immigration detention hotel in Australia on Thursday as the ...
9
Seymore, a ‘dynamic addition’ to NM United’s midfield group
Local Sports
Will Seymore says numerous factors were ... Will Seymore says numerous factors were involved in his decision to sign with New Mexico United for the 2022 season. Food was only part ...