Q&A: Republican gubernatorial candidate Rebecca Dow - Albuquerque Journal

Q&A: Republican gubernatorial candidate Rebecca Dow

Rebecca L. Dow

NAME: Rebecca L. Dow

POLITICAL PARTY: Republican

OCCUPATION: Self employed

CITY OF RESIDENCE: Truth or Consequences

RELEVANT EXPERIENCE: State representative, nonprofit executive, business owner

EDUCATION: B.A. in business from Oral Roberts University, A.A. in early childhood from Tulsa Community College

CAMPAIGN WEBSITE: www.dowfornm.com

1. New Mexico is highly reliant on the oil and natural gas industries to generate revenue to fund state programs, as evidenced by recent oil boom and bust cycles. What steps should the Legislature take to diversify the state’s economy and revenue base?

New Mexico has abundant natural resources that could fund our state for decades. We need to embrace our extractive industries by cutting back regulations that reduce extraction. To diversity, we must have comprehensive tax reform, tort reform, and implement a regulatory environment similar to our neighboring states (Texas and Arizona).

2. During the last regular legislative session, there was an unsuccessful push to make it easier to keep certain defendants behind bars until trial. Should New Mexico law be changed to make it easier to hold individuals charged with violent offenses such as murder and first-degree child abuse behind bars until trial?

Yes. New Mexico’s rise in violent crime directly correlates to woke district attorneys, judges, and lawmakers putting their liberal agenda ahead of the safety of families, communities and businesses. New Mexico needs to keep violent criminals behind bars, fully fund law enforcement, prosecutors, probation and parole and secure the border.

3. What steps should the Legislature take to address crime and public safety amid a rise in violent crime rates?

Stop embracing far-left movements that handcuff/defund our police, restore qualified immunity, end catch and release, stop the flow of drugs into our communities through an open border, fully fund the requests of local and state law enforcement and provide Border Patrol the technology needed for real time visuals during border occurrences.

4. What changes, if any, should New Mexico make to its gross receipts tax code?

Eliminate it and replace it with sales tax. I support comprehensive tax reform.

5. New Mexico is currently the only state that does not pay its legislators a salary, though lawmakers do get per diem payments and can qualify for a legislative pension. Do you support or oppose a salaried Legislature and, if so, how much should lawmakers be paid?

No, New Mexico is 50th in education and employment meaning the Legislature hasn’t yielded results worthy of pay from New Mexican taxpayers. We shouldn’t be rewarding bad government.

6. What more, if anything, should the Legislature do to address a court ruling that found New Mexico is failing to provide a sufficient education to all students, especially Native Americans and those who don’t speak English as a first language?

The legislature should allow citizens to cast their vote for school choice through a constructional amendment. State investments should improve student outcomes, not fund failing systems. School choice means giving parents the option to choose an educational program they believe their child needs to reach their full potential, becoming productive members of society.

7. What should be the priority as New Mexico seeks to strengthen its health care system? How should the state address a shortage of nurses and other health care workers?

Creating a reliable regulatory environment for health care providers, lower malpractice premiums to recruitment and retain qualified providers, requiring students seeking taxpayer funded college to pursue high demand jobs, such as a health care career, and expecting them to work in New Mexico in exchange for their professional development.

8. In recent years, New Mexico has steadily increased spending on early childhood programs, such as home visiting, prekindergarten and child care assistance, and created a new early childhood trust fund. Do you support or oppose the proposed constitutional amendment on the November ballot that would withdraw more money from the state’s permanent school fund to increase funding for early childhood services and K-12 education?

I strongly oppose the final language and the proposed constitutional amendment. The Early Childhood Permanent Fund has adequate funding for evidence based early childhood programs targeting children who need it the most. The permanent school fund should be protected and preserved for the current beneficiaries, which includes funding for PreK-3rd.

9. In order to address climate change and air quality issues, do you support or oppose legislation limiting greenhouse gas emissions and requiring the state achieve net-zero emissions by 2050?

I oppose, the unrealistic green agenda will make New Mexicans pay more for fuel and utilities and will destroy farming and ranching. Common sense market driven statutes, rules and regulations will grow New Mexico’s economy, create more jobs, lead to affordable, reliable energy as well as high quality, affordable food.

10. New Mexico recently became the 17th state to regulate and tax recreational cannabis sales? What, if any, changes do you believe should be made to the existing law?

The statute is brand new so it’s difficult to say what changes are needed. Are patients losing access to cannabis for medical reasons? The established rules should be followed, and taxes should be paid, we must expand and fully fund law enforcement’s request to the special investigations unit and K9 programs.

11. Do you believe changes should be made to the emergency powers held by a governor during a pandemic or other time of crisis. If so, do you believe such powers should be expanded or reduced and in what specific ways?

Yes, emergency powers should be drastically reduced and shared with legislators. States like Florida with minimal shutdowns experienced faster economic recovery and no significant increase in deaths compared to New Mexico’s permanent closure of over 40% of small businesses. We’re at the mercy of COVID tyrants, it should end now.

12. What changes, if any, should New Mexico make to its election laws and primary system? Do you support or oppose opening the state’s primary elections to voters who aren’t affiliated with either major political party?

I support whatever the voters of New Mexico choose; our focus should be on strengthening the security of our elections meaning there should be one vote for one eligible citizen. I’d focus on cleaning up the voter rolls, implementing voter ID requirements, and keeping our elections transparent. I do not support third-party electronic voting software.

13. Would you support a merit-based evaluation system to determine how the state spends its capital outlay funding?

Yes, too many of Michelle Lujan Grisham’s friends have gotten rich off a system that rewards cronyism. We leave projects unfinished and rural New Mexico, particularly southeast New Mexico, is routinely forgotten when it comes time to allocate resources.

14. Do you support or oppose authorizing an independent redistricting commission to perform the once-per-decade task of redrawing New Mexico’s political boundary lines?

Yes, we must look at the lessons learned from the recent effort. Elite politicians and paid partisan groups played the major role in drawing the districts and have taken away the voice of the everyday New Mexican. We need a truly nonpartisan council with specific mandates to clean this process up.

Personal background

1. Have you or your business, if you are a business owner, ever been the subject of any state or federal tax liens?

No.

2. Have you ever been involved in a personal or business bankruptcy proceeding?

No.

3. Have you ever been arrested for, charged with, or convicted of drunken driving, any misdemeanor or any felony in New Mexico or any other state? If so, explain.

No.

Home » 2022 election » Q&A: Republican gubernatorial candidate Rebecca Dow


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