Baby stars, dancing galaxies: NASA reveals new cosmic views - Albuquerque Journal

Baby stars, dancing galaxies: NASA reveals new cosmic views

This image released by NASA on July 12, 2022, shows the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region, NGC 3324, in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on the James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals previously obscured areas of star birth, according to NASA. (SOURCE: NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI)

GREENBELT, Md. – A sparkling landscape of baby stars. A foamy blue-and-orange view of a dying star. Five galaxies in a cosmic dance. The splendors of the universe glowed in a new batch of images released Tuesday from NASA’s powerful new telescope.

The unveiling from the $10 billion James Webb Space Telescope began Monday at the White House with a sneak peek of the first shot – a jumble of distant galaxies that went deeper into the cosmos than humanity has ever seen.

Tuesday’s releases showed parts of the universe seen by other telescopes. But Webb’s sheer power, distant location from Earth and use of the infrared light spectrum showed them in a new light that scientists said was almost as much art as science.

“It’s the beauty, but also the story,” NASA senior Webb scientist John Mather, a Nobel laureate, said after the reveal. “It’s the story of where did we come from?”

This image released by NASA on July 12, 2022, shows the bright star at the center of NGC 3132, the Southern Ring Nebula, for the first time in near-infrared light. (SOURCE: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI via AP)

And, he said, the more he looked at the images, the more he became convinced that life exists elsewhere in those thousands of stars and hundreds of galaxies.

With Webb, scientists hope to glimpse light from the first stars and galaxies that formed 13.7 billion years ago, just 100 million years from the universe-creating Big Bang. The telescope also will scan the atmospheres of alien worlds for possible signs of life.

“Every image is a new discovery and each will give humanity a view … that we’ve never seen before,” NASA Administrator Bill Nelson said Tuesday, rhapsodizing over images showing “the formation of stars, devouring black holes.”

Webb’s use of the infrared light spectrum allows the telescope to penetrate the cosmic dust and see faraway ligh

This image provided by NASA on July 11, 2022, shows galaxy cluster SMACS 0723, captured by the James Webb Space Telescope. The telescope is designed to peer back so far that scientists can get a glimpse of the dawn of the universe about 13.7 billion years ago and zoom in on closer cosmic objects, even our own solar system, with sharper focus. (SOURCE: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI)

t from the corners of the universe, scientists said.

“We’ve really changed the understanding of our universe,” said European Space Agency director general Josef Aschbacher.

The European and Canadian space agencies joined NASA in building the telescope, which was launched in December after years of delays and cost overruns. Webb is considered the successor to the highly successful, but aging, Hubble Space Telescope.

Some of Hubble’s most stunning images have been shots of the Carina nebula, one of the bright stellar nurseries in the sky, about 7,600 light-years away. Webb project scientist Klaus Pontoppidan decided to focus one of Webb’s early gazes on that location because he knew it would be the frameable beauty shot. The result was an image of a colorful landscape of bubbles and cavities where stars were being born.

“This is art,” Pontoppidan said. “I really wanted to have that landscape. It has that contrast. We have the blue. We have golden. There’s dark. There’s bright. There’s just a sharp image.”

Michael Ressler, Project Scientist for the JWST Mid-Infrared Instrument, speaks in front of an image of the Carina Nebula, captured on the James Webb Space Telescope, during a news conference at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory onJuly 12, 2022, in Pasadena, Calif. (Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press)

On tap for release Thursday: A close-up of Jupiter that shows one of its faint rings and a few of its moons, he said.

Also among the new shots:

• Southern Ring nebula, which is sometimes called “eight-burst.” Images show a dying star with a foamy edge of escaping gas. It’s about 2,500 light-years away. One light-year is 5.8 trillion miles. “This is the end for this star, but the beginning for other stars,” Pontoppidan said. As it dies, it throws off parts that seed the galaxy with elements used for new stars, he said.

• Stephan’s Quintet is five galaxies in a cosmic dance that was first seen 225 years ago in the constellation Pegasus. It includes a black hole that scientists said showed material “swallowed by this sort of cosmic monster.” Webb “has just given us a new, unprecedented 290-million-year-old view of what this Quintet is up to,” Cornell University astronomer Lisa Kaltenegger, who was not part of the Webb team, said in an email.

• A giant planet called WASP-96b is about the size of Saturn and is 1,150 light-years away. A gas planet, it’s not a candidate for life elsewhere, but a key target for astronomers. Instead of an image, the telescope used its infrared detectors to look at the chemical composition of the planet’s atmosphere. It showed water vapor in the super-hot planet’s atmosphere and even found the chemical spectrum of neon, showing clouds where astronomers thought there were none.

“It moves you. This is so so beautiful,” Thomas Zurbuchen, chief of NASA’s science missions, said after the event. “Nature is beautiful. To me, this is about beauty.”

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