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News flash: Coffee cafe keeping it cordial

Duggan's Coffee opened recently near the intersection of Lead and Harvard. A dog named Boo Boo waits for his owner just outside the shop.  (Dean Hanson/The Albuquerque Journal)

Duggan’s Coffee opened recently near the intersection of Lead and Harvard. A dog named Boo Boo waits for his owner just outside the shop. (Dean Hanson/Albuquerque Journal)

Feel like a dose of news with that cup of joe?

How about a thoughtful conversation over some chai?

Kevin Scanlan doesn’t just want to serve steamy brew at Duggan’s Coffee, the shop he and his wife recently

Kevin Scanlan has given his new coffee shop a newspaper theme, giving breakfast items names like "Morning Edition" and placing several newspapers on the counter for customers to read.  (Dean Hanson/Albuquerque Journal)

Kevin Scanlan has given his new coffee shop a newspaper theme, giving breakfast items names like “Morning Edition” and placing several newspapers on the counter for customers to read. (Dean Hanson/Albuquerque Journal)

opened at 2227 Lead SE. He wants to serve an old-school cafe experience.

Scanlan says the couple set out to create a cozy, neighborhood atmosphere where customers might sit down and thumb through an actual newspaper and perhaps even engage in discussions about the world. It’s the kind of place Scanlan says he remembers from his youth in Kansas, a spot where friends and strangers alike discussed the day’s issues in a respectful way.

“The interesting thing back then, as opposed to now, is people then would agree to disagree,” he says. “They’d get up and leave (afterward) and come back the next day.

“They were happy to be able to sit down and chat with people in a cordial fashion.”

To inspire such a vibe, Duggan’s subscribes to a few different local and national publications and sets copies out for customers to read. (For those who prefer their information via the Internet, Duggan’s does have Wi-Fi, though Scanlan – whose father was a newspaper publisher in Kansas – admits he’s partial to the printed product.)

Customers can peruse the pages while munching on a newsy-sounding breakfast. Choices include the “Morning Edition,” a spread of eggs, hashbrowns, bacon or sausage ($6.40); and the “Metro” pancake plate ($4). Duggan’s is slowly rolling out some lunch items, starting with green chile chicken soup. Salads and panini are in the works, Scanlan says.

Gavin Scanlan is the son of the owners of the recently opened Duggan's Coffee, located at 2227 Lead SE.  (Dean Hanson/Albuquerque Journal)

Gavin Scanlan is the son of the owners of the recently opened Duggan’s Coffee, located at 2227 Lead SE. (Dean Hanson/Albuquerque Journal)

As for the coffee, Duggan’s is working with beans from Tijeras-based Fat Boy Coffee Roasters. The shop also offers Italian sodas.

If it all sounds a little old-fashioned, it certainly doesn’t look that way. Scanlan and his wife met while studying architecture at the University of New Mexico in the early 1980s and they’ve made design a priority at Duggan’s. The shop – located next to a laundromat and a few doors down from a piñata store – underwent a three-month remodel that gave it such a vibrant, polished look that some customers have asked if Duggan’s is part of a chain.

Nope.

Duggan’s is an entirely new venture from a couple who have decided to return to New Mexico after spending the last 30 years elsewhere, most recently in San Diego.

“Being in California means 50- and 60-hour workweeks,” says Scanlan, whose architecture practice dealt in custom homes and public school work. “After putting in our time, we decided this would be a good time (to) try something different.”

Duggan’s is located at Lead and Harvard. It’s open 6:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 7 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturday.

Runway reaching out to men

Runway Apparel is ready to attract a new audience.

The Northeast Heights boutique known for women’s clothing and accessories recently added men’s apparel to its inventory.

Dara Ambriz, co-owner of Runway Apparel, says adding men's clothing to the Northeast Heights boutique was in response to customer demand.  (Adolphe Pierre-Louis/Journal)

Dara Ambriz, co-owner of Runway Apparel, says adding men’s clothing to the Northeast Heights boutique was in response to customer demand. (Adolphe Pierre-Louis/Albuquerque Journal)

Dara Ambriz, who owns the shop with Lori Medik, says the move came in response to requests from male friends as well as female shoppers. Women, she says, were “coming in saying ‘I wish I could shop for my husband while I’m here, because I really like your aesthetic and style.'”

Runway has started small, incorporating a single men’s rack at the back of the store. It’s currently full of jeans, chinos, polos, graphic Ts and more. The lineup includes Turkey-based Mavi jeans (which start at $88) as well as American-made brands like Kinetix.

Ambriz plans to bolster the assortment with more clothes and some accessories such as belts.

Whether it’s men’s or women’s clothing, she says the emphasis remains the same: “casual chic” attire for any age.

“Our demographic for women is high school to women in their 70s,” she says.

Runway Apparel is now offering clothing for men, including jeans, chinos and T-shirts.  Jason Cochran models some of the new items.  (Adolphe Pierre-Louis/Journal)

Runway Apparel is now offering clothing for men, including jeans, chinos and T-shirts. Jason Cochran models some of the new items. (Adolphe Pierre-Louis/Albuquerque Journal)

Adding men’s clothing is part of a larger rebranding effort at the 4½-year-old store. Other changes include some new women’s fashions, like whimsical dresses from Sugarhill Boutique and jeans from Dittos.

Runway is located in the North Towne Plaza at Wyoming and Academy (5901 Wyoming NE).

It’s open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday through Friday and 11 a.m.-5 on Saturday. The phone number is 797-7087.

Z-Coil celebrates milestone

The world is a much springier place because of Al Gallegos.

Gallegos – inventor of the Z-Coil shoe – says the Albuquerque-based company sold its 1 millionth pair last month.

It’s a milestone about 20 years in the making.

A runner, Gallegos was merely looking for a more cushioned foot strike when, in the mid-1980s, he began trying to rebuild his shoes with a spring in the heel.

But Gallegos – who used to own a department store in Española – eventually realized he had a legitimate enterprise on his hands. He incorporated in 1995, and his son, Andres, runs the company.

Gallegos never imagined this type of success. The company’s annual sales soared as high as $12 million at the pre-recession peak, Gallegos says, and were sold through about 270 outlets around the U.S. Those numbers dropped during the economic downturn, but Gallegos says the shoes are sold in about 150 outlets today and that sales are “coming back up again.”

Z-Coils come in several styles – including athletic shoes, clogs and sandals – and typically run between $100-$250.

Gallegos, now 82, is still fascinated by cushioning and says he is currently working on designing a more protective football helmet.

“It’s really been a fun time developing all these projects,” he says.

Keva dives into juice

The city’s most recognizable smoothie company is mixing things up.

Keva Juice – which has 13 metro-area locations and one in Las Cruces – is now serving fresh-squeezed juice alongside its repertoire of smoothies and frozen yogurt.

The company is already squeezing carrots, ginger, beets and apple, and there are plans to add spinach, kale, celery and cucumbers in the coming weeks. Keva will also introduce a beet-based red juice blend and a green blend with spinach and celery.

Tug Herig, president of Keva’s parent company Southwest Brands, says fresh juice is another way to meet customer demand for a healthy, drinkable meal or snack.

And it’s not a total stretch: Keva has for years sold carrot juice alongside its extensive menu of smoothies, and Herig says it was actually a good seller.

“We have all the equipment, since we’ve been doing it all along,” he says. “Now it’s just a matter of putting something else in the juicer versus just carrots.”

Keva’s fresh juice runs $4.95 for a 12 ounces or $6.95 for 24 ounces.

If you have retail news to share, contact me at jdyer@abqjournal.com or 823-3864. For more regular updates on Albuquerque shopping and restaurant news, visit my blog at abqjournal.com or follow @ abqdyer on Twitter.

 

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