Delivery alert

There may be an issue with the delivery of your newspaper. This alert will expire at NaN. Click here for more info.

Recover password

Roadrunner Food Bank receives kudos

PITCHING IN

The Roadrunner Food Bank has received a four-star rating for the fifth consecutive year from Charity Navigator, placing it among the top 4 percent of charities nationwide for demonstrating good governance and ethical practices.

“Roadrunner Food Bank strives to consistently operate in accordance with our core values of integrity and accountability,” Melody Wattenbarger, president and CEO of Roadrunner Food Bank, said in a news release. “We have been entrusted by the community to serve hungry people in our state, and we make every decision with that duty in mind.”

Volunteers sort baked goods at Roadrunner Food Bank, the largest nonprofit dedicated to solving hunger in New Mexico.  (Albuquerque Journal File)

Volunteers sort baked goods at Roadrunner Food Bank, the largest nonprofit dedicated to solving hunger in New Mexico. (Albuquerque Journal File)

Charity Navigator is considered the largest and most-utilized independent evaluator of nonprofit organizations in the United States.

The food bank has earned four out of a possible four stars in two categories – fiscal responsibility and accountability/transparency.

It received an overall score of 65.23 out of a possible 70. Its financial score was 63.26 out of 70, and its accountability/transparency score was a perfect 70 out of 70.

Ken Berger, president and CEO of Charity Navigator, said in a statement, “This ‘exceptional’ designation from Charity Navigator differentiates Roadrunner Food Bank of New Mexico from its peers and demonstrates to the public it is worthy of their trust.”

More information about Charity Navigator’s findings can be found at charitynavigator.org.

Employees and board members of the Sawmill Community Land Trust gather around a $41,318 display grant check.  (Courtesy of Sawmill Community Land Trust)

Employees and board members of the Sawmill Community Land Trust gather around a $41,318 display grant check. (Courtesy of Sawmill Community Land Trust)

Roadrunner Food Bank, a Feeding America member, is the largest nonprofit dedicated to solving hunger in New Mexico and operates locations in Albuquerque and Las Cruces.

Last year, the Food Bank distributed more than 26 million pounds of food through its own programs, a statewide network of partner agencies and regional food banks, helping nearly 40,000 children, seniors and adults weekly.

Sawmill Community Land Trust recently received a $41,318 Wells Fargo Environmental Solutions for Communities grant.

Sawmill was selected among 54 environmental nonprofits to receive grant money totaling $3 million from the 2014 Wells Fargo Environmental Solutions for Communities grant program, which supports projects focused on land and water conservation, energy efficiency, infrastructure and educational outreach in communities across America.

The money will be used to construct a 1-acre community garden in the Arbolera de Vida development, the trust said in a news release.

Issues of food security and a reclamation of the area’s pre-industrial use were strong drivers behind the community’s inclusion of the garden in the Arbolera de Vida master development plan.

“Sawmill Community Land Trust is thrilled to be working with Wells Fargo and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation on this exciting community garden project,” said Wade Patterson, executive director at Sawmill Community Land Trust, in a statement.

“The project will provide access to land for area households to learn about cultivation, produce their own food and establish stronger social ties within the community. The garden will serve residents of Sawmill Community Land Trust, along with residents of the older parts of the neighborhood.”

The Wells Fargo Environmental Solutions for Communities grant program began in 2012 as part of Wells Fargo’s commitment to provide $100 million to environmentally focused nonprofits and universities by 2020. It is funded by the Wells Fargo Foundation with a $15 million, five-year commitment to promote environmental stewardship across the country.

The program funds proposals that help address the most pressing environmental issues identified by each participating community.

Last year in New Mexico, YouthWorks and The Trust for Public Land each received a $50,000 grant.

YouthWorks partnered with the Bureau of Land Management to restore the area around Santa Cruz Lake. The Trust for Public Land worked to preserve and restore the Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge.

Administered by the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the 2013 Wells Fargo Environmental Solutions for Communities grants program planted 132,709 trees and restored more than 1,600 acres of habitat. These projects have trained 150 people in “green” jobs, while engaging more than 689,000 community members in the supported environmental grant programs.

AlertMe

Advertisement

Suggested on ABQjournal

TOP |