Delivery alert

There may be an issue with the delivery of your newspaper. This alert will expire at NaN. Click here for more info.

Recover password

Students work to ban drones

DAILY TIMES/JON AUSTRIA Daisy Edel shows a picture of an aerial-drone recently during a presentation at Ladera Elementary School in Farmington.

DAILY TIMES/JON AUSTRIA
Daisy Edel shows a picture of an aerial-drone recently during a presentation at Ladera Elementary School in Farmington.

FARMINGTON – Fifth-grade students at Ladera Del Norte Elementary School are taking part in a statewide project to learn about civics, government and protecting wildlife by working on state legislation to ban the use of drones for hunting purposes.

Wendy Carpenter’s class is taking part in this year’s Wild Friends program organized by the University of New Mexico School of Law to learn about the state government by working on a “memorial” to prohibit the use of unmanned aerial vehicles or drones while hunting. Memorials are a statement of lawmakers’ intent, but do not have the force of law. Lawmakers sponsor and vote on them just like bills.

Susan George, director of Wild Friends, said students statewide voted at the end of August on a topic, and have been conducting research to define what a drone is and possible uses for the machines.

The students were given a presentation by Wild Friends science educator Daisy Edel about those topics.

“I’ve learned most people only know about drones in respect to the military,” Edel said. “They have never been exposed to any other kind of drones.”

Edel’s goal was to explain to the students how a drone can have multiple uses, including mapping, storm-chasing, monitoring wildlife and vegetation, science research and livestock management.

Student Bailey Perkins said drones should be prohibited for hunting since they give the hunter an unfair advantage over the animals, potentially enabling them to kill more animals than their licenses allow and to poach.

“They can send up the drone and look around in the mountains without a license, and they can get the exact location of the animals,” Perkins said. “They can go up there and kill it, even though they don’t have a license, without anyone knowing.”

The students will continue to learn about state government and how the three branches of government operate during a field trip to the state Capitol in Santa Fe when the Legislature is in session.


Albuquerque Journal and its reporters are committed to telling the stories of our community.

• Do you have a story about how coronavirus has affected you, your family or your business? Do you have a question you want someone to try to answer for you? What issues related to the topic would you like to see covered? Or do you have a bright spot you want to share in these troubling times?
   We want to hear from you. Please email yourstory@abqjournal.com or Contact the writer.
AlertMe
TOP |