Recover password

The ear is as important as the eye in SITE’s new show

"Honey Baby" by Janine Antoni and Stephen Petronio. (Courtesy of SITE Santa Fe)

“Honey Baby” by Janine Antoni and Stephen Petronio. (Courtesy of SITE Santa Fe)

SANTA FE, N.M. — Sound plays a big part in many of the pieces in SITE Santa Fe’s new summer 20 Years/20 Shows exhibition, which opens to the public today (Saturday) from noon-5 p.m.

My favorite is probably “Honey Baby” by Janine Antoni with Stephen Petronio.

The visual aspect is a 14-minute video of a naked man performing almost a dance within a tube-like space, giving the appearance of floating and turning within a womb.

Advertisement

Continue reading

It is accompanied by a vaguely muffled, rhythmic heartbeat-like sound.

And viewers are enclosed within a dark room shut off by a black curtain.

Very womb within a womb.

Shadows from Amy Cutler's installation at SITE Santa Fe. (Jackie Jadrnak/Albuquerque Journal)

Shadows from Amy Cutler’s installation at SITE Santa Fe. (Jackie Jadrnak/Albuquerque Journal)

And Amy Cutler, working with Emily Wells and Adriana Papaleo creates a space that feels like a camp-out within the woods, with actual tree trunks surrounding a lean-to, with hairy ropes strung among them all.

The ambient sound reminds one of breaths, gasps and similar sounds.

If you go inside the lean-to, you can don headphones and adjust the sound track you want to listen to.

Dario Robleto has worked with sound historian Patrick Feaster and Lance Ledbetter to link visual representations of pulse and heartbeat with sounds you can listen to through earphones.

But my favorite element of the series, “Goodbye, Babylon,” includes some recordings of great old spirituals.

Talk about reaching for the heart.

TOP |