Series offers guided tours, discussions with artists, scholars - Albuquerque Journal

Series offers guided tours, discussions with artists, scholars

Moccasins (Kiowa) dating to about 1870 are made of deer hide, hardened natural hide soles, various trade cloths, beads. (Courtesy of the Ralph T. Coe Foundation for the Arts/Addison Doty)
Moccasins (Kiowa) dating to about 1870 are made of deer hide, hardened natural hide soles, various trade cloths, beads. (Courtesy of the Ralph T. Coe Foundation for the Arts/Addison Doty)

The Ralph T. Coe Foundation for the Arts will continue its Curatorial Conversation Series at the Wheelwright Museum in Santa Fe.

This series of public conversations provides guided tours and discussions through the exhibition guided by the Coe Foundation’s curator and executive director, Bruce Bernstein, and a sequence of local artists and scholars.

The talks give an intimate look into the curatorial process and objects of “Connoisseurship and Good Pie: Ted Coe and Collecting Native Art” which takes viewers from a point of origin of one passionate and well-versed man to open up questions regarding relationships among artists, collectors, curators, viewers, and institutions. Each guest will bring personal insights into the production, collecting and marketing of Native Arts.

The first conversation in the series is with artist Dallin Maybee, on Wednesday, Feb. 3.

Maybee (Northern Arapaho/Seneca) has been chief operating officer of the Southwestern Association for Indian Arts since 2014 and is an award-winning and accomplished beadworker and international performer and lecturer.

The second conversation is with art dealer and appraiser Scott Hale, on Feb. 24. Hale, of Southwest Art Appraisers, has taught at the University of Oklahoma in the English department, film and video studies program, Native American studies program and School of Art.

The final conversation in the series is with artist Ken Williams, on April 5. Williams (Northern Arapaho/Seneca), manager of the Wheelwright Museum’s Case Trading Post, is an award-winning beadworker and major collector of Native American art.

Williams primarily creates innovative, pictorial, beaded fancy bags for which he received the Best of Show award at the 2014 Heard Museum Guild Indian Fair & Market in Phoenix. His work has been included in major exhibitions from Los Angeles to New York, most recently in the current exhibition at the Peabody Essex Museum, Native Fashion Now.


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