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Pulsing crowds and a frozen robot

See that flower in the robot's right hand? It's supposed to be lifted periodically to its nose for a sniff. But apparently the mechanism outside the new Meow Wolf Arts Comples doesn't meet city electrical codes. (Eddie Moore/Journal)

See that flower in the robot’s right hand? It’s supposed to be lifted periodically to its nose for a sniff. But apparently the mechanism outside the new Meow Wolf Arts Comples doesn’t meet city electrical codes. (Eddie Moore/Journal)

 

It must have been all those people thinking, “Well, let’s wait a few weekends after it opens and check out Meow Wolf’s new exhibit after the crowds die down.”

So many must have been thinking it that last Saturday (April 9) turned out to the biggest day so far at the House of Eternal Return, which opened March 18. Some friends and I arranged to meet there only to find that the former bowling alley was at capacity. Some people left, some hung around, some queued up the practically the length of the building to wait to get in.

And it turns out that not all of them were newcomers; several told Meow Wolf CEO Vince Kadlubek while he was manning the door that they already were making return visits. Kids, adults and oldsters were all among the people heading toward the doors.

It gave me a chance to ask something, though, that had been bothering me. After promises that the giant robot in the parking lot would be lifting the daisy in his hand to his nose and sniffing it once the place opened, the rust-orange robot was still stubbornly still.

Turns out the massive sculpture doesn’t meet the city’s electrical code. Kadlubek said it would cost about $5,000 to bring the big guy up to standards.

“It meets Burning Man code!” Kadlubek quipped.

Well, that is one of the many places Taos artist Christian Ristow has shown his creative projects.

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