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Give & Receive

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — Money, for the right reasons and in the right hands, can buy happiness.
As 2011 comes to a close, consider a tax-deductible donation to any of the many nonprofit, private local and statewide rescue groups and shelters that work tirelessly to save abandoned and homeless pets.All of them welcome volunteers – many operate solely with volunteers. All welcome supplies, like beds or pet food. All can use cash, because even a small amount can make a difference. All have stories to tell, not only about what they do, but what your donation can do.For instance, the “very pregnant and emaciated” boxer mix that had been kept on a chain until animal control officers confiscated her. She began giving birth to her litter in the van on the way to the shelter. She had 13 puppies, but could not provide milk. Bottle feeding was the only way to save four of them, now in the care of PACA and Dogs Deserve Better, dedicated to helping chained or penned pets.Puppy formula costs $50 per can, “and it doesn’t even last a week,” according to Leslie Judd of PACA. Meanwhile, the pups have had three veterinary visits, and all need to be sterilized and get their shots and microchips.However, the pups and their mother are thriving and eventually will be available for adoption.Then there’s Chesterton, another PACA save: “A poor old orange cat who spent the last five or six years out on the streets despite being elderly, declawed and having severe eye disease, including untreatable melanoma,” Judd says.Chesterton is out of the cold, getting vet care, and in a foster home. His medication to prevent blindness and pain costs $30 a month.Hercules, a chow mix, is another PACA story. He was found in a hoarder’s home, where he had lived in a closet, eight to 12 hours a day for eight years.It looked as if euthanization might be necessary, but a veterinarian thought he could be saved. “He still is horribly skinny, even after gaining 10 pounds, but he feels much better and plays like a puppy,” Judd says.A $25 donation would help pay off the vet bill for a dog that made it, despite the odds.

People’s AntiCruelty Association/Albuquerque Animal Rescue
505-315-0004, 505-255-0544 pacacats@aol.com or pacadogs@aol.comnmpaca.orgP.O. Box 21280Albuquerque, 87154-1280

Watermelon Mountain Ranch

Every little bit helps
505-315-0004, 505-255-0544
pacacats@aol.com
or
pacadogs@aol.com

nmpaca.org
P.O. Box 21280
Albuquerque, 87154-1280Watermelon Mountain Ranch

1512 Deborah Road SE
Rio Rancho, NM 87124
505-771-0140
www.wmranch.org
At Watermelon Mountain Ranch, the Rio Rancho-based no-kill shelter, it costs the vet clinic about $271 per animal, which includes spay/neuter, microchip, shots, food and other necessities. An average stay is 30 days, but many are longer – two dogs were placed recently that had been at the ranch for three years.

One of the more special residents was Harley, who had been hit by a car. He was 4 months old, and so badly hurt that both of his back legs had to be amputated.

With the help of donations, $2,000 was raised that also paid for a dog cart. Harley’s mobile. He’s in a loving home, and here’s the best part: He’s a therapy dog now, visiting nursing homes and hospitals, and bringing hope.

Fabulous Felines

attn: Hal P.O. Box 14841 Albuquerque, 87191 www.fabulousfelines.org
The volunteers at Fabulous Felines are, like all the rescues, always in need of supplies like cat food and litter. And like all the rescues, they get smacked with expensive emergencies.

Such as Hal, a sweet, affectionate, former street cat in foster care that developed a severe urinary tract blockage that would have killed him if left untreated. He’s been hospitalized and will need surgery, and Merry Stubblefield says that she expects the bill for his care will come to about $3,000. 1512 Deborah Road SE
Rio Rancho, NM 87124
505-771-0140
www.wmranch.org
At Watermelon Mountain Ranch, the Rio Rancho-based no-kill shelter, it costs the vet clinic about $271 per animal, which includes spay/neuter, microchip, shots, food and other necessities. An average stay is 30 days, but many are longer – two dogs were placed recently that had been at the ranch for three years.

One of the more special residents was Harley, who had been hit by a car. He was 4 months old, and so badly hurt that both of his back legs had to be amputated.

With the help of donations, $2,000 was raised that also paid for a dog cart. Harley’s mobile. He’s in a loving home, and here’s the best part: He’s a therapy dog now, visiting nursing homes and hospitals, and bringing hope.

Fabulous Felines

attn: Hal P.O. Box 14841 Albuquerque, 87191 www.fabulousfelines.org
The volunteers at Fabulous Felines are, like all the rescues, always in need of supplies like cat food and litter. And like all the rescues, they get smacked with expensive emergencies.

Such as Hal, a sweet, affectionate, former street cat in foster care that developed a severe urinary tract blockage that would have killed him if left untreated. He’s been hospitalized and will need surgery, and Merry Stubblefield says that she expects the bill for his care will come to about $3,000.

“He is being such a good sport about everything – curious about the hospital and friendly with the staff,” she says.

“We are a no-kill organization and are committed to Hal’s treatment. Fabulous Felines has a strict policy of providing medical treatment, no matter how costly, to any cat who can be restored to health, and sometimes this results in unplanned expenses. I would say any donation toward his treatment would be greatly appreciated, as this was, of course, not budgeted.”

Quixote Humane Inc.

P.O. Box 1285 Peralta, NM 87042
505-869-2397
www.quixotehumane.org
From Judy Babcock, the founder and president of Quixote Humane in Valencia County:
Our Christmas wish is for a forever home for Wrangler.
Hundreds of dogs have come into our rescue over the past 10 years and have been placed in loving homes. Wrangler is still waiting. He was left in the outside drop-off kennels at the Valencia County animal shelter three years ago. We don’t know how long before he was abandoned that his leg was broken.
The surgery to align and pin the bones in place went well, but the injury was too old and the bones did not heal completely. He can use the leg but is not able to take long walks or play rough with the other foster dogs. Our little man is about 6 years old and weighs around 10 pounds.
Even on the warmest days Wrangler loves to burrow into a pile of blankets or bask in the sun. He gets along with the other dogs, but prefers the company of people. He gets so excited when he gets to go for a ride, even if it is to the vet’s office; his eyes twinkle and his tail goes a mile a minute. Of course, a snuggle and cuddle are on the top of his list of wishes.
At adoption clinics lots of people have held and hugged him and said how handsome he is, but no one has committed to giving him what he so desperately wants, a person of his own.

Lap Dog Rescue of New Mexico

P.O. Box 1316
Tijeras, NM 87059
505-934-2202
www.lapdogrescue.org
Email: lapdogrescue@
lapdogrescue.org or
lapdogrescue_newmexico@
yahoo.com
Lap Dog Rescue of New Mexico also has items it can always use, such as grooming supplies and cleaning supplies, and more than anything needs people willing to foster rescued dogs until they’re adopted.
It also has its share of special cases.
Bert and Ernie, Lhasa apso mixes, were found as strays in northern New Mexico. Not only were they in serious need of grooming when Lap Dog Rescue got them, but Bert had head trauma, a cherry eye that had to be fixed and lymphomas removed. Both were neutered. Their vet bills were more than $1,200.
But the little dogs are safe now, and will be placed in a home, where they belong, together.
Young Mona, a miniature pinscher cross, is only 2 or 3 years old but her knees need to be surgically repaired. That’s estimated to cost $3,000.
“Donations to the Mona Fund will enable us to surgically repair her little legs and get her on the road to finding a new and loving forever home,” says Marie Steele, the president of Lap Dog Rescue of New Mexico.

EnchantMutts

P.O. Box 23143
Albuquerque, 87192
505-980-7827
www.EnchantMutts.org
EnchantMutts usually pays $250 to $300 to get routine needs met for rescued dogs, shots, heartworm tests, spay/neuter and so on, but often gets dogs out of shelters that otherwise would have no chance at all, especially at shelters in New Mexico towns that have no animal welfare resources. There, a stray might have three days before it’s put down; an owner-surrender, as little as one day.
Often, says Krista Edwards, dogs are given up – “tossed away” – because the vet bills are too high, or “they become too decrepit.”
It cost EnchantMutts about $375 to fix young, bouncy Barley’s broken leg. He’s in a home now and doing just fine. But Theo, an older dog, has multiple issues: severe arthritis, and he’s got to have four canine teeth removed, along with some lower front teeth. He has exposed roots and “infection is closing in.”
Theo has had some hard years, Edwards says. “The vet seems to think that with some maintenance and good food and care the old guy just might enjoy a good year or two! So in the end and in the right home, there is hope that this guy might just enjoy what we don’t think he ever had,” being cared for and being part of a loving family.

Animal Humane New Mexico
615 Virginia SE Albuquerque, 87108
505-255-5523
www.animalhumanenm.org
Animal Humane New Mexico is bigger, older, well-established and well-known. And it relies on donations and volunteers as well, even though it can support a paid staff, which is made possible by donors and community support.
Its shelter has thousands of stories, but a very typical one is Kallie, a lovely calico cat whose owners brought her to Animal Humane, saying they couldn’t afford to care for her.
Kallie gave birth to five kittens the next day. While in foster care, she “adopted” three kittens that came to Animal Humane as orphans, and nursed and cared for them as well. Altogether, she was at Animal Humane for six months.
If you add up general care costs (vaccines, medications, adoption services, microchip, food, facilities), foster care costs, the costs of the “Cats Around Town” program, in which Kallie participated, that displays adoptable cats in local businesses, and costs to treat her upper-respiratory infection, the grand total was $854.
She was adopted by a family that said Kallie was “everything they were looking for.”
It’s a success story, Animal Humane says, that “wouldn’t have been possible without support from generous donors.”

Enchantment Great Pyrenees Club
P.O. Box 1146 Cedar Crest, NM 87008
email Plcourt@aol.com to
donate supplies
www.enchantmentgreatpyrenees
.com
Like other rescues, spay/neuter fees take a big portion of the budget at Enchantment Great Pyrenees Club, but because Pyrenees are big dogs, those surgeries cost $1 more per pound over a weight of 40 or 50 pounds. Also, bigger dogs take bigger doses of medications, need larger kennels to board and grooming fees are higher as well.
“I actually think these costs contribute to (the need for) rescue as once people realize how much a bigger dog might cost them, and the cute little puppy is now a 1-year-old, 90-pound dog that is still maturing but has puppy brains, Pry rescue gets the call,” says Patty Court of EGPC.
One of those calls: an 8-week-old female Pyrenees found in the East Mountains, who is blind.
She was taken into foster care, came down with parvo – usually deadly in puppies – and it cost almost $1,500 to save her. She’s now 6 years old, happy, health and in a loving home.

Luvin’ Labs
505-362-0331
www.luvinlabs.com
Even a modest donation to Luvin’ Labs, which rescues and re-homes Labrador retrievers statewide, can make a difference: $8 keeps a dog safe and warm for a day in a boarding kennel as it waits for adoption or an opening at a foster home. For $13, a microchip, a permanent ID that can save the dog’s life.
Of course, there are the huge costs as well: $800 to have a leg rebuilt, $600 to have severely broken leg amputated. Rescues see these injuries and victims all the time.
Montana and Dakota were broken in a different way. They were abandoned by owners who told the city shelter that they couldn’t afford the dogs, and didn’t want them. The Labs were terrified at the shelter. Dakota became very sick and was euthanized. Montana was so frightened she couldn’t get up off the floor when a Luvin’ Labs foster tried to comfort her. She has tumors and needs extensive surgery, but meanwhile has adjusted to her new but temporary home.
“Montana’s happy ending at the moment is that she is a safe and cherished member of a foster family,” says Colleen Wyatt, one of the rescue’s founders.
Montana is waiting for her forever home.courtesy of encHantmutts Theo is an older dog being cared for by EnchantMutts. He does have a chance, although it didn’t appear very good at first.Every little bit helps Here’s a sample of what donations buy, as furnished by Albuquerque Cat Action Team, Second Chance Animal Rescue Inc. and GPA-New Mexico Greyhound Connection:
â–  can get a cat vaccinated for rabies
â–  help with kenneling a senior Lab mix until he’s fostered or adopted
n will feed a foster cat for a month
â–  pays for the series of distemper/parvo vaccines that puppies need
â–  provides medication for a dog’s ear allergies
â–  pays for tests for feline leukemia/feline “AIDS”
â–  spays a cat in Gallup, as part of the effort to reduce the number of homeless pets in rural areas
n gets a greyhound her needed vaccinations
â–  covers most of the spay/neuter costs for a puppy as well as helping to pay for spaying the mother dog
n covers one cat neuter surgery
â–  feeds two cats with special diet needs for two months
â–  provides spay/neuter for a greyhound and a dental cleaning

A.C.A.T. (Albuquerque Cat Action Team)
P.O. Box 51683, Albuquerque, 87181
505-323-ACAT (2228)
505-291-1121 Fax
www.AlbCat.com

GPA-New Mexico Greyhound Connection
www.gpa-nm.org
505-573-6305

Second Chance Animal Rescue, Inc.
P.O. Box 15194
Rio Rancho, NM 87174
secondchancenm@yahoo.com

www.secondchancenm.org

For a full list of local and statewide animal welfare organizations and rescue groups, visit the New Mexico Animal Resource Directory at www.petroglyphsnm.org.

1512 Deborah Road SERio Rancho, NM 87124505-771-0140www.wmranch.orgAt Watermelon Mountain Ranch, the Rio Rancho-based no-kill shelter, it costs the vet clinic about $271 per animal, which includes spay/neuter, microchip, shots, food and other necessities. An average stay is 30 days, but many are longer – two dogs were placed recently that had been at the ranch for three years.

One of the more special residents was Harley, who had been hit by a car. He was 4 months old, and so badly hurt that both of his back legs had to be amputated.
With the help of donations, $2,000 was raised that also paid for a dog cart. Harley’s mobile. He’s in a loving home, and here’s the best part: He’s a therapy dog now, visiting nursing homes and hospitals, and bringing hope.

Fabulous Felines
attn: Hal P.O. Box 14841 Albuquerque, 87191 www.fabulousfelines.orgThe volunteers at Fabulous Felines are, like all the rescues, always in need of supplies like cat food and litter. And like all the rescues, they get smacked with expensive emergencies.

Such as Hal, a sweet, affectionate, former street cat in foster care that developed a severe urinary tract blockage that would have killed him if left untreated. He’s been hospitalized and will need surgery, and Merry Stubblefield says that she expects the bill for his care will come to about $3,000.

“He is being such a good sport about everything – curious about the hospital and friendly with the staff,” she says.

“We are a no-kill organization and are committed to Hal’s treatment. Fabulous Felines has a strict policy of providing medical treatment, no matter how costly, to any cat who can be restored to health, and sometimes this results in unplanned expenses. I would say any donation toward his treatment would be greatly appreciated, as this was, of course, not budgeted.”

Quixote Humane Inc.
P.O. Box 1285 Peralta, NM 87042505-869-2397www.quixotehumane.orgFrom Judy Babcock, the founder and president of Quixote Humane in Valencia County:Our Christmas wish is for a forever home for Wrangler.Hundreds of dogs have come into our rescue over the past 10 years and have been placed in loving homes. Wrangler is still waiting. He was left in the outside drop-off kennels at the Valencia County animal shelter three years ago. We don’t know how long before he was abandoned that his leg was broken.The surgery to align and pin the bones in place went well, but the injury was too old and the bones did not heal completely. He can use the leg but is not able to take long walks or play rough with the other foster dogs. Our little man is about 6 years old and weighs around 10 pounds.Even on the warmest days Wrangler loves to burrow into a pile of blankets or bask in the sun. He gets along with the other dogs, but prefers the company of people. He gets so excited when he gets to go for a ride, even if it is to the vet’s office; his eyes twinkle and his tail goes a mile a minute. Of course, a snuggle and cuddle are on the top of his list of wishes.At adoption clinics lots of people have held and hugged him and said how handsome he is, but no one has committed to giving him what he so desperately wants, a person of his own.

Lap Dog Rescue of New Mexico
P.O. Box 1316Tijeras, NM 87059505-934-2202www.lapdogrescue.orgEmail: lapdogrescue@lapdogrescue.org orlapdogrescue_newmexico@yahoo.comLap Dog Rescue of New Mexico also has items it can always use, such as grooming supplies and cleaning supplies, and more than anything needs people willing to foster rescued dogs until they’re adopted.It also has its share of special cases.Bert and Ernie, Lhasa apso mixes, were found as strays in northern New Mexico. Not only were they in serious need of grooming when Lap Dog Rescue got them, but Bert had head trauma, a cherry eye that had to be fixed and lymphomas removed. Both were neutered. Their vet bills were more than $1,200.But the little dogs are safe now, and will be placed in a home, where they belong, together.Young Mona, a miniature pinscher cross, is only 2 or 3 years old but her knees need to be surgically repaired. That’s estimated to cost $3,000.”Donations to the Mona Fund will enable us to surgically repair her little legs and get her on the road to finding a new and loving forever home,” says Marie Steele, the president of Lap Dog Rescue of New Mexico.

EnchantMutts
P.O. Box 23143 Albuquerque, 87192 505-980-7827 www.EnchantMutts.org EnchantMutts usually pays $250 to $300 to get routine needs met for rescued dogs, shots, heartworm tests, spay/neuter and so on, but often gets dogs out of shelters that otherwise would have no chance at all, especially at shelters in New Mexico towns that have no animal welfare resources. There, a stray might have three days before it’s put down; an owner-surrender, as little as one day. Often, says Krista Edwards, dogs are given up – “tossed away” – because the vet bills are too high, or “they become too decrepit.” It cost EnchantMutts about $375 to fix young, bouncy Barley’s broken leg. He’s in a home now and doing just fine. But Theo, an older dog, has multiple issues: severe arthritis, and he’s got to have four canine teeth removed, along with some lower front teeth. He has exposed roots and “infection is closing in.” Theo has had some hard years, Edwards says. “The vet seems to think that with some maintenance and good food and care the old guy just might enjoy a good year or two! So in the end and in the right home, there is hope that this guy might just enjoy what we don’t think he ever had,” being cared for and being part of a loving family. Animal Humane New Mexico 615 Virginia SE Albuquerque, 87108 505-255-5523 www.animalhumanenm.org Animal Humane New Mexico is bigger, older, well-established and well-known. And it relies on donations and volunteers as well, even though it can support a paid staff, which is made possible by donors and community support. Its shelter has thousands of stories, but a very typical one is Kallie, a lovely calico cat whose owners brought her to Animal Humane, saying they couldn’t afford to care for her. Kallie gave birth to five kittens the next day. While in foster care, she “adopted” three kittens that came to Animal Humane as orphans, and nursed and cared for them as well. Altogether, she was at Animal Humane for six months. If you add up general care costs (vaccines, medications, adoption services, microchip, food, facilities), foster care costs, the costs of the “Cats Around Town” program, in which Kallie participated, that displays adoptable cats in local businesses, and costs to treat her upper-respiratory infection, the grand total was $854. She was adopted by a family that said Kallie was “everything they were looking for.” It’s a success story, Animal Humane says, that “wouldn’t have been possible without support from generous donors.” Enchantment Great Pyrenees Club P.O. Box 1146 Cedar Crest, NM 87008 email Plcourt@aol.com to donate supplies www.enchantmentgreatpyrenees .com Like other rescues, spay/neuter fees take a big portion of the budget at Enchantment Great Pyrenees Club, but because Pyrenees are big dogs, those surgeries cost $1 more per pound over a weight of 40 or 50 pounds. Also, bigger dogs take bigger doses of medications, need larger kennels to board and grooming fees are higher as well. “I actually think these costs contribute to (the need for) rescue as once people realize how much a bigger dog might cost them, and the cute little puppy is now a 1-year-old, 90-pound dog that is still maturing but has puppy brains, Pry rescue gets the call,” says Patty Court of EGPC. One of those calls: an 8-week-old female Pyrenees found in the East Mountains, who is blind. She was taken into foster care, came down with parvo – usually deadly in puppies – and it cost almost $1,500 to save her. She’s now 6 years old, happy, health and in a loving home. Luvin’ Labs 505-362-0331 www.luvinlabs.com Even a modest donation to Luvin’ Labs, which rescues and re-homes Labrador retrievers statewide, can make a difference: $8 keeps a dog safe and warm for a day in a boarding kennel as it waits for adoption or an opening at a foster home. For $13, a microchip, a permanent ID that can save the dog’s life. Of course, there are the huge costs as well: $800 to have a leg rebuilt, $600 to have severely broken leg amputated. Rescues see these injuries and victims all the time. Montana and Dakota were broken in a different way. They were abandoned by owners who told the city shelter that they couldn’t afford the dogs, and didn’t want them. The Labs were terrified at the shelter. Dakota became very sick and was euthanized. Montana was so frightened she couldn’t get up off the floor when a Luvin’ Labs foster tried to comfort her. She has tumors and needs extensive surgery, but meanwhile has adjusted to her new but temporary home. “Montana’s happy ending at the moment is that she is a safe and cherished member of a foster family,” says Colleen Wyatt, one of the rescue’s founders. Montana is waiting for her forever home.courtesy of encHantmutts Theo is an older dog being cared for by EnchantMutts. He does have a chance, although it didn’t appear very good at first.Every little bit helps Here’s a sample of what donations buy, as furnished by Albuquerque Cat Action Team, Second Chance Animal Rescue Inc. and GPA-New Mexico Greyhound Connection: â–  can get a cat vaccinated for rabies â–  help with kenneling a senior Lab mix until he’s fostered or adopted n will feed a foster cat for a month â–  pays for the series of distemper/parvo vaccines that puppies need â–  provides medication for a dog’s ear allergies â–  pays for tests for feline leukemia/feline “AIDS” â–  spays a cat in Gallup, as part of the effort to reduce the number of homeless pets in rural areas n gets a greyhound her needed vaccinations â–  covers most of the spay/neuter costs for a puppy as well as helping to pay for spaying the mother dog n covers one cat neuter surgery â–  feeds two cats with special diet needs for two months â–  provides spay/neuter for a greyhound and a dental cleaning A.C.A.T. (Albuquerque Cat Action Team) P.O. Box 51683, Albuquerque, 87181 505-323-ACAT (2228) 505-291-1121 Fax www.AlbCat.com GPA-New Mexico Greyhound Connection www.gpa-nm.org 505-573-6305 Second Chance Animal Rescue, Inc. P.O. Box 15194 Rio Rancho, NM 87174 secondchancenm@yahoo.com www.secondchancenm.org For a full list of local and statewide animal welfare organizations and rescue groups, visit the New Mexico Animal Resource Directory at www.petroglyphsnm.org.

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