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Ex-Intel Manager Reports 40 Laid Off

By Andrew Webb
Journal Staff Writer
    A former training manager at Intel Corp.'s Sandoval County plant says she is one of 40 supervisors and managers let go from the local plant as part of a worldwide layoff of 1,000 managers, which was publicly announced last week.
    Lillian Romero, 59, says she is unhappy about the way she was dismissed after 23 years with the company. She said she was informed by her manager she would be among the dismissed Thursday after receiving a companywide e-mail from Intel CEO Paul Otellini outlining the company's plans.
    "I'm a true-blue Intel person," she said. "Everybody knew things were going to happen ... but I expected it to be people who had performance problems or issues with their direct reports. My reviews have been superior. I've never had a negative review, ever. I walked out of there feeling like I was of no value."
    Intel New Mexico spokeswoman Liz Shipley and Intel corporate spokesman Chuck Malloy said they could not confirm that 40 employees had been let go from Rio Rancho.
    "We're not breaking that down by location," Malloy said.
    Intel's Rio Rancho plant employs about 5,600, and has about 3,800 independent contractors.
    Company officials last week said the layoffs stemmed from "efficiency analysis and industry benchmarking" that indicated management redundancy.
    Facing increasing competition from other computer chip companies, such as Advanced Micro Devices, Intel announced in April sweeping restructuring plans after reporting lower-than-expected first-quarter profits.
    The affected employees will receive a compensation package, including several months of severance pay, payments to cover health insurance and job placement help, Shipley said last week.
    Intel has received $24 billion in industrial revenue bonds from Sandoval County since 1995, which give the company tax breaks on equipment and other purchases. The IRBs do require that Intel hire at least 60 percent of its staff locally but do not stipulate employee headcount levels, county spokesman Gayland Bryant said Monday.
    Romero joined Intel in 1983 as an overnight-shift manufacturing technician and moved up the ranks to her most recent position, which involved supervising employees who develop training programs, and other training-related duties.
    She said her supervisors would not tell her why she was chosen to be let go.
    "That's not the Intel I worked for," she said. "They've been a great company to work for, but I guess I'm just angry with the process."