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          Front Page




New Names, No Screen Printer, and a CEO

By Andrew Webb
Of the Journal
    TECH BYTES: After six years of phone calls from shoppers seeking T-shirts and trophies, Albuquerque engineering firm Team Specialty Products has changed its name to Team Technologies.
    "We decided we either needed to buy a screen printer or change the name," says Danny Sachs, who owns the company with his brother, Bob.
    Team was founded in 1985 by Dave Rice to build specialty electronics and other components for Sandia National Laboratories' pulsed power division.
    The name aimed to portray the company as part of a team with Sandia, Sachs said.
    "When we bought the company, we left it at that because of tradition," he said, adding, however, that the new owners turned it into an acronym: Total Engineering And Manufacturing.
    But Team has gone on to serve a wide range of customers besides Sandia, including other government agencies and commercial customers like Northrop Grumman and Albuquerque industrial truck builder MEGA Corp., for which Team Technologies builds electronic controllers.
    "We decided it was time to freshen our logo, so we went with a name that reflects the high-tech work we do," Sachs said.
    Team Technologies, which has been at the Sandia Science and Technology Park on the city's far eastern edge since 2000, employs 55.
    The company continues to make experimental hardware for Sandia, including targets vaporized in Sandia's Z-machine, a recently refurbished pulsed power device used to simulate blasts, as well as custom electronics, control modules and printed circuit boards.
    WASATCH NAME SWAP: Wasatch Venture Fund, which expanded from Salt Lake City to the shadow of the Sandias in 2003, has changed its name to reflect its regional reach.
    The company is now Epic Ventures.
    Wasatch/Epic's multiple funds have attracted $35 million in investment from the state and target a wide range of high-tech startups, making it one of the most active out-of-state investment firms here. Local investments include solar cell manufacturer Advent Solar, digital aircraft instrument developer Aspen Avionics, genomic marker pharmaceutical firm Exagen Diagnostics, blood-alcohol detection firm Veralight, and Lumidigm, which makes high-tech fingerprint scanners.
    Wasatch was originally to be a Utah-centric investment firm when it was founded by Zions Bank in 1994. It now has investments in Utah, Idaho, Arizona and New Mexico.
    ADVENT GETS NEW CEO: Advent Solar has appointed semiconductor industry veteran Peter Green as its new president.
    Green replaces Advent founder Rusty Schmit, who will remain on the company's board of directors, and will focus on strategic initiatives, according to a company news release.
    After 22 years in various senior management roles at Intel Corp., Green most recently led a division of ON Semiconductors in Phoenix.
    Advent's solar cells are based on technology developed at Sandia National Laboratories that allows them to absorb more light than conventional cells, while costing less to make.
    "Peter joins us as we are on the cusp of commercializing this technology," Advent board member Ken Lawler said in a statement.
    Advent, whose manufacturing processes are similar to those used in the semiconductor industry, is currently retooling its production line to make larger solar cells.
    It employs 160.
   




    Andrew Webb covers technology for the Journal. You can reach him at 823-3819 or awebb@abqjournal.com.