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PROJECT INDEX

DAY ONE:
  • Most in N.M. Believe Illegal Immigration a Problem

    DAY TWO:

  • Illegal Immigrants Providing for Families Difficult To Stop

  • Immigrants at N.M.'s Border Share Plans

  • Drugs Keep Pouring Across Border

    DAY THREE:

  • Illegal Immigrants Who Cross Have Little To Fear

  • Mexican ID Card Helps Immigrants in U.S.

  • ABCs of Immigration


    DAY FOUR:

  • Illegal Immigrants— Economic Friends or Foes?

  • Stores Cater to Immigrants

    DAY FIVE:

  • Immigrants Most Likely To Seek Childbirth Help, Emergency Treatment

    DAY SIX:

  • N.M. Schools Aim To Educate All Students

  • Students Continue Trek to Deming

  • Immigrant Students Need Help

    DAY SEVEN:

  • Illegal Immigrants Overburden Judicial System

  • Las Cruces Courthouse Cranks Through Immigration Cases

    DAY EIGHT:

  • Tension Among Hispanic Groups Erupt in Schools

  • Flavor, Flair of Mexico Travel North

  • Congress To Tackle Immigration Reform






  • READER POLL:

    How did you react to "Day Without Immigrants" Protest?

  • E-mail a suggestion
  •   
    Note: Poll results are not scientific and reflect the opinions of only those who choose to participate.



    READER POLL:

    What do you think should be done about illegal immigration?

  • E-mail a suggestion
  •   
    Note: Poll results are not scientific and reflect the opinions of only those who choose to participate.



    The Border and Beyond

    Each year, thousands of illegal immigrants cross into New Mexico, the majority passing through to bigger cities. Their presence here and elsewhere in the U.S. is a growing controversy.

    They provide inexpensive labor and pay taxes, but strain already burdened emergency rooms, schools and courtrooms.

    A team of Journal reporters spent the past few months exploring the effects -- good and bad -- of illegal immigration on the state.



    Poll: Most New Mexicans Believe Illegal Immigration a Problem
    By Leslie Linthicum / Journal
      First in a series: New Mexico has a split personality when it comes to illegal immigrants. Most New Mexicans believe illegal immigration is a serious or somewhat serious problem, and they don't want illegal immigrants to receive many of the benefits often tied to citizenship, such as food stamps, driver's licenses, college scholarships and free health care for their children.

    Flow of Illegal Immigrants Desperate To Provide for Families Difficult To Stop
    By Rene Romo / Journal
      Second in a series: COLUMBUS, N.M.— A wall map in a surveillance camera control room at the U.S. Border Patrol's Deming office is criss-crossed with dozens of dotted pink lines.

  • Marijuana, Cocaine, Heroin Keep Pouring Across Border more

  • Immigrants at N.M.'s Border Share Plans Before Attempting To Enter U.S. more

    Illegal Immigrants Who Make It North Have Little To Fear
    By Debra Dominguez / Journal
      Third in a series: Find an apartment, get a job, attend school. Thousands of New Mexico's illegal immigrants lead normal lives with little chance of being deported. That's because Border Patrol manpower and money are focused on the border— a policy praised by some and condemned by others.

  • Mexican ID Card Helps Immigrants in U.S. more

  • The ABCs of Immigration more

    Illegal Immigrants— Economic Friends or Foes?
    By Andrew Webb / Journal
      Fourth in a series: They pay taxes. They're willing to work back-breaking, monotonous jobs for low wages. There's no question illegal immigrants play a role in the state's economy. But some question: At what cost to legal residents?

  • Duke City Stores Cater to Immigrants more

    Immigrants Most Likely To Seek Childbirth Help or Emergency Treatment
    By Jackie Jadrnak / Journal
      Fifth in a series: In New Mexico, the cost of providing health care to undocumented immigrants is one more straw on an already-beleaguered camel's back. The health care system here is strained by a high poverty rate and the second-highest rate of uninsured people in the country.

    N.M. Schools Aim To Educate All Students
    By Debra Dominguez and Russell Contreras / Journal
      Sixth in a series: Educators don't question the cost of extra school programs needed to teach immigrant students.

  • Immigrant Students Need Help To Graduate more

  • Palomas Students Continue Trek to Deming more

    Illegal Immigrants Crush Courts in Overburdened Judicial System
    By Jeff Jones / Journal
      Seventh in a series: LAS CRUCES— A stream of men and women file into federal court, the clinking of their leg shackles punctuating the hum of activity from lawyers and interpreters.

  • Courthouse in Las Cruces Cranks Through Immigration Cases Day After Day more

    Tensions Among Hispanic Groups Erupt in Schools
    By Gabriela C. Guzman / Journal
      Eighth in a series: New Mexico, which prides itself on its rich multicultural heritage, has seen an increase in traditions and businesses from south of the border in recent years. The reason? An influx of immigrants. That influx has also increased tensions in some areas between longtime Hispanics and newcomers from Mexico.

  • Flavor, Flair of Mexico Travel North more

  • Congress Poised To Tackle Immigration Reform This Winter more