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          Front Page

October 7, 1999


  • Highlights: Native plants and rescued, nonreleasable animals inhabit an enhanced natural setting on 122 acres.
  • Location: Nineteen miles east of Albuquerque, 50 miles south of Santa Fe. From I-25, exit 187 and turn north on Highway 344 to Frontage Road. Drive west to signs at 87 N. Frontage Road.
  • Round-trip distance: About 2 miles around the park to see each habitat
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Elevation: About 6,600 feet
  • Cautions: Always stay on trails. Do not tease, feed or touch the animals
  • Maps: Available at ticket office
  • Admission: $3 for adults, $2 for students and seniors. Children under 5 free.
  • Printable map

  • Wildlife West

    Celebrate Wildlife New Mexico, an annual event that takes place at Wildlife West Nature Park, offers regular tours of the park highlighted with educational presentations, storytelling, art and live music.
    The public is invited to Celebrate Wildlife New Mexico, located east of Albuquerque, Saturday-Monday from 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
    Over the weekend, visitors can participate in hourly raptor presentations, as well as observe Phantom, the mountain lion, and Griddley, the gray wolf.
    Each day from 11 a.m.-noon, Jakey Skye will tell Navajo stories and embellish each with a flute accompaniment.
    Doug Scott, a sculptor from Taos, will spend the three days sculpting a large piece of art. When he needs a break from the marble, he'll put the guitar strap over his shoulder to accompany his singing.
    In addition to all this, visitors can enjoy the Youth Leader Group's Talking Talent Presentation, go on a hayride pulled by a Belgian draft horse, enjoy special wildlife classes and art shows.
    Wildlife West Nature Park opened five years ago and is operated as an educational project of New Mexico Wildlife Association, a not-for-profit corporation. All work for pay is done by high school students who have built pens and barns for the wild, nonreleasable animals.

    Sue B. Mann