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          Front Page




Bill Would Fund New Coors Rules

By Andrea Schoellkopf
Journal Staff Writer
    It's time to update the rules for developing along Coors Boulevard, some residents say, to protect views and control traffic.
    City Councilor Michael Cadigan, who represents the upper West Side, has introduced a bill that would fund a $150,000 update of the Coors Corridor Plan— adopted by the council in 1984.
    The council is scheduled to consider the resolution at its March 7 meeting.
    Under the resolution, the updates would establish high-quality design standards regarding development, open spaces and other public areas and increase "visual harmony" between new and existing buildings and the natural environment.
    Last year, West Siders called for a revision of the plan after walls began appearing on both sides of Coors. As it turned out, the area on the west side of Coors and the area south of the La Luz neighborhood did not have view protections built into the Coors Corridor plan.
    "A lot of those empty parcels are starting to fill up," Cadigan said
    The plan update also would include Coors south of I-40, which Councilor Miguel Gómez sought.
    Joe Valles, president of the West Side Coalition of Neighborhood Associations, said the Coors Corridor Plan has not been enforced.
    The current plan is supposed to limit stoplights to intersections every half-mile and includes medians in between to prohibit left turns in traffic.
    Coors "was supposed to be more of a parkway, more like Tramway," Valles said. "... People that were involved in creating the Coors Corridor plan are nothing but disappointed with the way the city has enforced it."
    Rae Perls, president of the La Luz Landowners Association, which is southeast of Montaño and Coors, said the other issue is whether the view from Coors is inclusive of the bosque and the city lights, or is limited to the mountain range.
    "We have some major concerns about huge walls and double story buildings being built flush up to Coors and totally blocking all views," she said. "... It's a tragedy to those of us who live on the West Side, to see it destroyed by the greediness of developers."
    She said unless the Coors Corridor plan is updated, developers will be able to build however they want.
    Cadigan said he's also concerned about the commercial developments that are being built against the bosque, and whether they are designed with respect for the open space.
    "We paid ... a lot of money for that open space," Cadigan said, referring to the city's $13.8 million in private bosque land acquisitions in the last year for city open space. "We would like to come up to design standards to make sure commercial development along the bosque has respect for the bosque. We don't want garbage cans and loading docks along our $15 million of open space."
    In a separate bill, Cadigan is seeking traffic signalization for Bosque Meadows residents, who live north of La Orilla. Cadigan said he may also try to get a frontage road— the original intent for the area— built for the 100-home subdivision to access La Orilla or Eagle Ranch traffic lights.